• @llwy12 THANKS so much for the info and recommendation too. I have been debating about whether to see this series or not. One of my friends only watched it because Kitty Lai is in it as she is a big fan of Kitty Lai so I did not trust her opinion. Let me try to find the original version to watch. The soundtrack to a series is important too. There is definitely way more to a series than the cast only but sadly many just blindly go for the cast without caring about anything else.
  • @llwy12 Yes, "On the Edge" is definitely Francis series. I watch the series for Deric, but, ended up root for Francis. Deric's character was harder to root for since he got everything easily (compared to Francis who was always the one making sascrifices). I was especially annoyed with Deric's impulsive action in Malaysian airport, which partly lead to what happen at the end.
  • @jimmyszeto Sean was most definitely the lead in The Challenge of Life. At most, we can say that Leon was second male lead over Frankie Lam, who was the 2nd main villain (since Fong Kong was the main villain), but Sean’s status was pretty obvious. I agree that most everyone gave brilliant performances in TCOL (which is another one of my all-time favorite TVB series), though in my opinion, the “weak link” was actually Monica Chan….Leon was fairly decent in this series (he emoted a lot better than the previous series he was in). Even Frankie, who I’ve always felt is hit and miss (if he gets a role that suits him, he does well but if not, his acting doesn’t live up to standards) did a decent job in this series…though absolutely Fong Kong nailed it with his performance as the violent gangster / Leon’s long-lost dad (and yes, it’s TVB’s loss that Fong Kong never filmed much for them because he is absolutely a brilliant actor – to me, he doesn’t even need to “act” the villain because he can scare the living daylights out of people by merely looking at them, lol). Oh also standout performance from Wayne Lai (a role of his that I still remember and love, lol) who was actually a highlight of the series for me. In terms of female performances, both Kitty and Jacqueline were wonderful, as was the mom played by Ng Wan Yee (another green-leaf actress I love) – Monica, whose acting I’ve never felt was good, was billed as the lead (coming off her MHK win in 1989), but her performance was definitely the weakest (not unusual of course given that’s TVB’s usual pattern in terms of placing inexperienced MHKs into series)…regardless though, I was still ok with her performance, probably because the rest of the cast was so good and the script was excellent, so her weak performance was overshadowed and don’t really notice as much. And you are absolutely right about Ming Sir in The Breaking Point, though to be honest, he has always been brilliant in all his roles (another favorite in terms of green-leaf actors).
  • @jayne Not sure why my comments are awaiting moderation now. I sent you an email separately....
  • @jimmyszeto Sean was most definitely the lead in The Challenge of Life. At most, we can say that Leon was second male lead over Frankie Lam, who was the 2nd main villain (since Fong Kong was the main villain), but Sean’s status was pretty obvious. I agree that most everyone gave brilliant performances in TCOL (which is another one of my all-time favorite TVB series), though in my opinion, the “weak link” was actually Monica Chan….Leon was fairly decent in this series (he emoted a lot better than the previous series he was in). Even Frankie, who I’ve always felt is hit and miss (if he gets a role that suits him, he does well but if not, his acting doesn’t live up to standards) did a decent job in this series…though absolutely Fong Kong nailed it with his performance as the violent gangster / Leon’s long-lost dad (and yes, it’s TVB’s loss that Fong Kong never filmed much for them because he is absolutely a brilliant actor – to me, he doesn’t even need to “act” the villain because he can scare the living daylights out of people by merely looking at them, lol). Oh also standout performance from Wayne Lai (a role of his that I still remember and love, lol) who was actually a highlight of the series for me. In terms of female performances, both Kitty and Jacqueline were wonderful, as was the mom played by Ng Wan Yee (another green-leaf actress I love) – Monica, whose acting I’ve never felt was good, was billed as the lead (coming off her MHK win in 1989), but her performance was definitely the weakest (not unusual of course given that’s TVB’s usual pattern in terms of placing inexperienced MHKs into series)…regardless though, I was still ok with her performance, probably because the rest of the cast was so good and the script was excellent, so her weak performance was overshadowed and don’t really notice as much. And you are absolutely right about Ming Sir in The Breaking Point, though to be honest, he has always been brilliant in all his roles (another favorite in terms of green-leaf actors).
  • @kidd 隨緣 was actually the theme song to “On the Edge”, the series Deric co-starred in with Francis Ng and Sheren Tang (though Francis was really the one to watch in the series, as he gave a phenomenal performance!). It’s a great song, one that every time I hear it, I feel like re-watching the series all over again even though it’s such a sad series and the ending always makes me cry....
  • @llwy12 my concert date is the 17th. I love the MGM Grand. Have been to many an event there. You know, one can never get tired of seeing and listening to Jacky perform. There is dancing and props and and energetic entertaining in his concerts, but most of all, there is singing, which is why any fan who knows good singing is there to see and hear. The thing about Jacky is you can strip away all the glitz and glamour and still walk away knowing you have been entertained. That is not the case with most singers nowadays.
  • @bubbletea Are you going to the Saturday show or the Sunday one? I saw all the fanvids and pics from the 3 Connecticut shows and got excited all over again! Hoping Jacky will do something special for the Vegas one, since it does fall on CNY….so jealous of the Singapore audiences who got to live feed with Wu Fung’s concert 2 nights in a row – that interaction between Jacky, Nick Cheung, and Wu Fung in itself was worth the price of those tickets, lol! Yup, definitely agree that there is nothing wrong with that type of meet-and-greet, especially for those fans who might only have that one opportunity to see their idol in the flesh, since concerts aren’t always easily accessible to everyone (I know a lot of Jacky fans who had to fight hard to get tickets to his concert and many who still weren’t able to do so despite jumping through many hoops). I think whatever suits their fancy, then go for it as long as they’re not harming anyone in the process.
  • @llwy12 Nothing wrong with shaking a celebrity's hand, having a photo-op, or seeing him/her up close and personal in the flesh. I am also going to Jacky's Vegas concert in a few days too. Jacky is worth every penny for his concerts. You get your money's worth and then some.
  • @passingby Yup, you’re right, though sadly that’s how most things work nowadays….very few people actually take the time to read the fine print and understand the situation – instead, they see one thing and immediately jump online to gripe about it. In any case, regardless of the misunderstanding thing, I also wouldn’t pay that much for a celebrity meet-and-greet, even if it’s an artist I really really like. Heck, I wouldn’t even pay that much to watch a concert (of course the one exception being Jacky Cheung, who is worth every darn penny of the $511 USD I paid for my ticket to see his upcoming Las Vegas show). With that said though, I don’t fault these celebrities for making money this way, especially when there are fans willing to pay – some fans are satisfied merely getting a glimpse of their idol or being able to shake his/her hand, which I don’t see a problem with at all. I’m not that type of fan but I definitely don’t begrudge those who are.
  • @kidd That’s true about Lawrence, though I will be honest and say that up until Healing Hands, most of Lawrence’s best and most memorable roles were as villains. For me, his villain roles in both The Feud Between Two Brothers and The Grand Canal are ones that I still remember to this day. Bobby Au Yeung kind of falls into the same category for me – I grew up watching him play villain / pseudo-villain roles as well as dramatic, serious roles so later when he got typecasted into comedic roles, I felt it was somewhat of a shame because I know how versatile he CAN be….this is also why nowadays I rejoice when I see Bobby playing “serious” non-comedic roles (which has honestly been very very rare in recent years). Anyway, one thing’s for sure – we definitely had A LOT of versatile actors/actresses back in the day (80s/early 90s) so it’s no wonder that TVB was able to achieve such great success with their huge talent pool back then, though for me, it also means that seeing how much TVB has deteriorated in the past 20 years is even more depressing and sad...
  • @llwy12 I can understand Deric not wanting to play villains anymore at the time. He played villain roles one after another at the time. I could be he was afraid of being typecast. I also wish he could play more good guys roles at the time. Lawrence Ng is another actor who hates playing villains. But, he didn't go so far as Deric Wan as to outright reject all villain roles.
  • @llwy12 Let’s go back 1995 in Plain Love, where women were seen to be married to farmers and had no power(Gallen had to rape Kathy Chow on wedding night) up until ‘The Silver Chambers of Sorrows’ in 2008 where Paul Chun Pui treated the women in his family like dirt including drowning Nancy Wu in a well for cheating. Eventually in the family turned against him in a bloody battle in the finale. So yeh.... ‘the Forgotten Valley’ new genre or old?. They must think we are silly people.....
  • @longhair84 I’m thinking no one has complained because most people don’t know. Those of us who’ve watched those classic series and know the original content probably can spot it, but for someone who has never seen the series before, unless they’re really paying attention, they probably are not going to notice (or maybe they are fans of the replacement songs so they would rather not say anything so TVB keeps their idols’ songs in there). The songs maybe – especially if it’s something as glaring as putting a Raymond Lam song into a series from 1990 – but the music is much harder to detect. I actually didn’t know about this issue at first because I have most of TVB’s classic series (the original versions that came out back in the day) either on video tape or DVD somewhere and those are usually the versions I watch/re-watch – the other ones I’ve seen online were the original versions as well. I only found out because HK01 (media outlet) did a few articles on it, since they’ve been covering most of TVB’s midnight timeslot series (literally doing a play-by-play of sorts each week with inside information on the artists and some of the plot points of the series)…after reading those articles, I did some research on my own and was able to link it back to the Universal thing. To be honest though, even if people do complain, TVB isn’t going to care because that’s just how they are – they don’t apologize or change because doing so means they are admitting wrongdoing (I can only think of one instance in the last decade where TVB actually publicly apologized for something that they screwed up and gave a commitment to fixing it). Even if they get a lot of complaints, like the time when they got 10K + complaints over their usage of Simplified Chinese characters in their newscasts (and even their former management said they should be using traditional Chinese due to them being a HK television station), yet they still continued to do it, justifying it with some bogus excuse. Just this past week, TVB got into hot water when their news reporters were caught on video impeding rescue operations at last weekend’s Tai Po bus crash site in HK (the stupid TVB reporter kept asking the firefighters and police officers to “give them 3 and a half minutes” to do a quick report for their telecast when the firefighters were telling them to get out of the way so they could lift up the bus to check for trapped passengers) – they got major flack for that, including thousands of angry complaints both online and to their station, yet they released a statement basically defending the reporter and claiming that the firefighters “didn’t lift the bus until several hours later” anyway so they didn’t see it as impeding operations. I mean, people’s lives were on the line, yet TVB didn’t care and were only concerned about getting their report done and then when the outraged public complained, they didn’t even apologize, instead using every excuse in the book to justify their position (including putting the blame on the firefighters for taking so long to lift the bus). With such a huge issue as the above (their reporters impeding rescue efforts), TVB doesn’t heed the public’s complaints, of course they aren’t going to give a crap about people’s complaints of them switching out songs!
  • @llwy12 that's just laughable, playing a Raymond Lam song even though Raymond Lam was only around 11 years old at the time of when they broadcasted this originally. It's not just the songs but the background music, sure some of the bgm isn't original and taken from a lot of Hollywood movies but they added so much to the scenes. I'm surprised no one has complained, but knowing tvb's style I doubt they would even care anyway.
  • @longhair84 Yup…that was the main reason (which makes sense given his personality) but another reason was that playing villains gave him a bad reputation, which is of course ironic given his subsequent relationship scandals (all of which gave him an even worse reputation). But of course he loosened up on this (either that or he forgot he ever said it, lol) because when he returned to TVB in the post 2000 era, he did play villains again in a few series…
  • @jimmyszeto That’s because they know for a fact that most of the “see-lais” (housewives) who watch the series definitely aren’t going to think too deeply into things and most of the younger ones who watch TVB nowadays have no clue about what series TVB produced in the past because most weren’t even born yet (i.e. the “after 2000s” audiences), so they can pull the wool over majority of audience’s eyes and get away with it like they usually do, since the only ones questioning are people like us who honestly make up the minority of TVB’s audience pool. Yes, it’s shameful and embarrassing on the part of TVB, but that’s how they are....
  • @longhair84 The issue mainly stems from all the songs that are under the Universal label (which includes all the old Polygram songs that were a staple of many old TVB classics). Because of TVB’s fallout with Universal (which honestly TVB did to themselves because their stupid Voice CEO Herman Ho disrespected Universal with their ridiculous demands), they made the decision to switch out all of the songs that they no longer have the rights to (some they bought long time ago so those are fine). Honestly, instead of switching out the song, they could’ve made the effort to ask Universal if they could continue to use it this one time since it would impact the series if they don’t – I’m sure Universal would’ve agreed because they aren’t petty like TVB is…or if TVB is planning to re-broadcast series with a lot of songs under the Universal label, then they should sit down and re-negotiate with them again – either that or don’t air the series period! But of course, TVB isn’t going to do that – my suspicion is that they don’t even know which series have songs in them that are under Universal (most of the current management wasn’t around back then so they probably have no clue). Even if they do know though, they aren’t going to ask because 1) asking is akin to “losing face” which they of course aren’t going to do, 2) they don’t give a crap that switching out the songs impacts the series, which is in-line with their general attitude toward all their series, 3) they are lazy and figured switching out the songs is easier. For BOGAE specifically, I had heard that during one of the earlier episodes – I don’t remember which episode but it’s the scene where Ho Nam (Deric) and Diane (Kitty) just finished having dinner at his house and she is pissed at him because he told his parents they are getting married when there was actually no previous discussion about it between the two of them. Diane then leaves and goes to see her friend Sam (which of course Ho Nam sees because he was following her). At this time, the song that played in the original version was Beyond’s “Forgive Me Today” which had lyrics that fit perfectly with the scene – with the midnight timeslot version though, TVB switched out Beyond’s song (they used to be under Polygram label so the rights to the song belong to Universal now) and put in Raymond Lam’s “Your Love” (the sub-theme song to “Moonlight Resonance”)…um, yea, seriously….Raymond’s song didn’t come out until 2008 and BOGAE is from 1990, plus Raymond’s song already belongs to another series, not to mention the lyrics don’t fit with the scene like Beyond’s song did. I’m glad I didn’t watch the midnight timeslot version because I would’ve been pissed as hell!!
  • @llwy12 I find that it is quite an embarrassment when TVB tries to justify that they have spent a lot of effort to discover this new ‘genre’ when it is just rehashed material. Desperation is setting in...
  • @llwy12 surprising that he made the decision to never take on villain roles as his most famous roles at the time were in Blood of Good and Evil, Looking Back In Anger and The Breaking Point - two of whom were not just the run-of-the-mill villains but memorable ones. I guess he thought as someone who was leading man material, he would never play the leading character if he was the villain of the story.
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