• Don't know what's more disgusting, TVB's dirty politics or people hiding behind their computer screens making fun of a stranger's looks.
  • @rucofan1100 Agree. Wonder if KM has already hit his high. No other hit really after Tiger Cubs and On Call, which were around the same timeframe. @peanutbutterjelly That's TVB for you. Always one step off. They don't push the envelope. They go to the edge and look down, never over. But to them, it's already a milestone. I agree if it was all one take, it would be more effective and like DoBW. Then again they probably didn't even think about DoBW. The comparison was boight up after the fact.
  • Hilarious concept but the execution is lacking. They mentioned 'days of being wild' well, they should've done it in one take like the scene in the movie. Use a steady wide shot. It would allow the viewer to feel the mundaneness, boredom and just a tad bit uneasiness because of the voyeuristic quality. Editing in the close up shots kind of ruined that.
  • @melia880 ViuTv had a reality program called 'Tagger' (對不起 標籤你, you can find all 10 episodes on YouTube) that kind of deals with social issues, stereotyping and discrimination. There are episodes that specifically dealt with gay, lesbian and transgender people. The show itself is alright, still a bit ignorant sometimes in how they present the issues or people involved but honestly I've expected worse, it's still entertaining but manages to make some good social commentary about the HK culture.
  • @llwy12 I think a bigger part of the problem is that the public perpetuates it by consuming their stuff. I've witnessed first hand in Hong Kong how someone was showing an Apple Daily video to one of his friends while saying how stupid it is. Why don't they just stop giving these scum 'news' channels views? Don't they realise they can only exist because there is a market for it? It's not like they don't have other news options either. I think this girl put it best: "香港人睇人仆街最開心" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=crOqWD9O2EI Sigh. By the way, for people that might be interested: ViuTv had a reality program called ‘Tagger’ (對不起 標籤你, you can find all 10 episodes on YouTube) that kind of deals with social issues, stereotyping and discrimination. There are episodes that specifically dealt with gay, lesbian and transgender people. The show itself is alright, still a bit ignorant sometimes in how they present the issues or people involved but honestly I’ve expected worse, it’s still entertaining but manages to make some good social commentary about the HK culture.
  • @peanutbutterjelly yes, but i honestly don't think moses & aimee's situation is applicable to what we're discussing. i can see how your example might be applicable in places like japan where the majority places great importance on early childhood development and forces moms to stop working and take care of kids until they reach adulthood. but most of Asia isn't so narrow-minded. the only example that comes to mind about guilting women into feeling awful about balancing work and childcare is Yang Mi & Hawick Lau. In their case, i do think their situation is unfortunate as they're starting up their company, so can't generate the time to raise their daughter. a lot of ppl mention that yang mi is rather negligent...which, she is. But so's Hawick. now THAT's a legitimate example of sexism at work. not Moses & Aimee.
  • @coralie "You guys make it sound like it’s some sort of injustice that you see this type of imbalance everywhere as if this isn’t something women enjoy." No, I think you misunderstood us. That's not what we're saying at all. I think @stargirl summed it up perfectly: "the surrounding culture, the societal expectations and peer pressure all play a role in enabling and condoning this kind of lifestyle where the mom is the main caregiver of the children." We're not criticising any woman's decision to be a homemaker. But we're appalled by the culture that essentially tries to pressure ALL women into this same decision. Mothers who tries balancing between a career and kids are being shamed, often being called selfish or made to feel guilty because of it. If you don't believe me try to google the very gender-neutral words: 'is my career a selfish choice'? I guarantee you it's not overwhelmingly men who ask this question. We are all but products of our environment but that doesn't mean we shouldn't be critical of the same environment that has shaped us. That's how progress is made. Ultimately everyone has to make the choice that they believe is going to make them happy but we have to ask ourselves: when one choice is obviously the 'easier' and more widely accepted one, are we really the ones that are choosing?
  • @coralie My statement comes from the knowledge that Moses once stated he's a pretty 'conservative' man (I think it was a Jaynestars article too). Maybe still unfair for me to say he most likely wouldn't but it's not baseless assumption either. I'm not judging him, or any other 'conservative' men out there for that matter, either. It's the culture that we are brought up in and the expectations of society. That's why it's important to criticise the environment and change the mentality of the status quo which we are all a part of. My goal is not to single anyone out to blame (Moses and Aimee's situation is just an example of a larger issue) but to stimulate people to think critically as to 'why' things happen the way they do.
  • A kiss is not inherently sexual. I can understand that people might find it weird when they themselves have only associated kissing on the lips with something inherently romantic or sexual but it is not. Platonic kisses on the lips dates back to further than the Middle Ages. To call Joseph disgusting is taking it way too far and the truly inappropriate thing that I see. Try googling 'parents kiss child' literally none of them peck their child with their eyes open so I don't understand the 'but his eyes are closed so it makes it more inappropriate' argument.
  • @peanutbutterjelly Right here: "I honestly don’t see Moses willing to stay at home for a year to bond with the kids in order to encourage Aimee to work on her career." You're projecting what a man might or might not do, specifically Moses, as if childrearing is a bigger chore than acting (though it might be to some.) Hence, why I defended men. Maybe Moses does want to stay home and be with the kids. He's always said he's a fan of Aimee and he wants to see her back at work too. But not right now because of the kids. The comment sounded very negative as if men don't want to take up the mantle. But sometimes they can't, is what you and I both agree on. And yes, that has to do with gender stereotypes, but in the case of Aimee & Moses, I don't even think this accusation applies. Y'all dragged a tiny example that doesn't even seem to even fit with the mold of what we're discussing. It makes practical sense for Moses to work and Aimee to stay at home with the kids (and most women actually prefer that.) I cited a real example of equality with Ruby & Wallace. Equality does happen, maybe not enough to keep everyone happy, but what's considered equal to one relationship is not considered the same in the other.
  • @peanutbutterjelly True, not all woman are the same but as a Mom I am speaking from my own experience. You can read what I wrote and agree or not agree. Or you can even skip it. Doesn't matter to me. Personally, I don't see why there is a need to dig a deeper meaning into something from this article. But hey if you guys are into things like that, good for you. I'm just going to end it by saying that I love reading Moses and Aimee family life. I honestly became their fan when they got married. Their marriage seem strong and their kids are adorable.
  • @happybi No two moms are the same. Not all women are the same. There are women who don't want children. There are women who regret having children. There are women who think motherhood is the greatest blessing in life. And you know what? None of these opinions are wrong. Your own experiences are valid but you should never speak for anyone else. You don't speak for all mothers or women. Simple as that.
  • @coralie That's exactly what @megamiaow and I were saying: the danger and unfairness of gender stereotype and expectations. It's not only harmful to women but also harmful to men. Like you said if men choose to be the primary caretaker of their children or if the woman makes more money than them they'd be labelled 'soft rice king' even though no such stigma is bestowed upon stay-at-home moms. That's harmful. Likewise, if a straight couple decides to have children and they're in a position that one of them has to give a up a career then it's usually the woman who is expected to do so. Even if having children is a mutual decision. We do not live in a society that expects men to quit their job to do child rearing while this pressure does exists for working woman who can 'afford' to stay at home. That is also harmful. We're not taking jabs at men, we're criticising the culture and society that is perpetuating such thinking and behaviour. Moses and Aimee are just examples, I don't doubt they're happy with their respective roles in the relationship but it's worth looking deeper into the culture that has influenced this dynamic and recognizing the dangers of being the products of our time and environment.
  • @peanutbutterjelly I agree! Moses does not leave much to desire. His acting is pretty wooden. I haven't seen that movie with Aimee and Chapman.
  • @peanutbutterjelly I'm surprised so few people here fails to see it too. So many arguing that maybe its ok "she chose", just like most the female population of asian women " chose" to stay at home and look after babies and have men come home to moan about their cooking. I am not for one minute fooled that the culture hasnt led to this and condoned this stereotype. Yes it has been their choice but it's a sad sight to see this culture still flourishing under a supposedly modern city.
  • @peanutbutterjelly I don't know, I feel like this is taking a stab at men for not wanting to do child-rearing. I'm not going to say that's not the case a good chunk of the time, but men staying home to be house husbands often get a lot of flak and pressure from outsiders too. Even when they want to be indoor caretakers, many times they are shamed out of the idea. You get these derogatory terms slammed on them like, "Soft Rice King," and plenty of judgmental stares, much like Kay Tse & Louis Cheung's relationship. The higher the profile of the woman, the more likely this is the case. This has to do with gender stereotypes, yes, but men shouldn't catch all the negativity about it either.
  • That's disgusting. No one deserves to go through such disrespectful and horrifying treatment.
  • Nothing wrong with being thrifty just like there's nothing wrong with being a big spender. As long as one live within once means. Let her be.
  • @anon I'd rather say that for Moses and he's more experienced than her. Aimee was pretty good as a lead actress in that movie with Chapman To.
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