• I am sorry, but no adult woman actually wants to look like a prepubescent girl.
  • @emerald5forever It did surprise me how such practice was exposed. They found the prefect face to front the scandal. I hope all other kids that was admitted by such means are kicked out of Uni.
  • @emerald5forever Your grandfather stuck to patriotic principles - unlike the younger generation lured by material benefits. Although some might question why he didn't live in China since he refused american citizenship. Wonder what he would think of HK loyalists like Denise Ho who has Canadian citizenship, and protesters wrapping themselves in British and US flags while singing the American national anthem?
  • @msxie0714 I know that anecdotes do not fare well in comments, but my grandfather actually turned down the opportunity to become a U.S. citizen when he was living in Los Angeles. He loved his motherland despite having lived through the Great Leap Backward and Cultural Revolution, so much that he refused a chance many others would have coveted and readily taken. He passed away years ago and is buried in LA, but to my knowledge he never actually changed his citizenship. If a man like my grandfather who had been poor his entire life refused citizenship, why aren’t these rich Mainland Chinese doing the same and retaining PRC citizenship as well? They just know how to boast their so-called loyalty but do not act on it.
  • @jjwong I guess it all comes down to human nature and our basic instinct to act on greed when opportunity strikes, no matter how badly they contradict our credibility and virtues. I cannot imagine anyone favoring anchor babies (extremely frowned upon), and I agree that U.S. immigration laws should be changed (they are broken right now).
  • @orchid123 That could also be it; I know my mom’s wealthy friend from Mainland China actually sent her two kids here to live with some ABCs, so they could learn English (I think her kids are studying in U.S. colleges now, and one may be going to London for graduate school).
  • @hohliu I agree with your comment, and it is baffling how some Chinese would risk losing face to do just that. I am sure that everyone has heard of the U.S. college admissions scandal by now. It involved many rich/prominent parents, but because Hollywood celebrities were also involved in the cheating, that took attention away from other parents and their children. There was a Chinese national who made it seem like she got admitted to a top-tier school through hard work/dedication, spewing inspirational nonsense on her social media and fooling everyone, and then it turned out daddy actually bought her seat. The only reason Western outlets did not cover it was because the Hollywood actresses were at the center and took the brunt of the attention.
  • I am Chinese-American and have heard of people coming to the States to give birth, so children get automatic citizenship. This in theory may help parents acquire U.S. citizenship faster (should they pursue that route), or at least be allowed to stay in the country. That is where the pejorative term “anchor baby” comes from. However, I have usually seen this occur with poor immigrants who seek a better life, so the fact that quite a number of successful Chinese celebrities appear to strategically give birth here is somewhat surprising. I mean, if they are already content with their lives in the good old motherland, why go to a foreign land and give birth there, and on top of that, why China’s main rival country? I am very surprised at some of the names listed, as I do not believe or recall them to have any ties to the U.S., whether it is living/studying abroad or having family members here. This makes me wonder if they had visited illegal maternity hotels that can be found in major cities’ Chinese communities (look it up, they exist). It is a very unscrupulous idea to say the least. In addition, it is not fair to the children themselves, if the Chinese celebrity parent(s) somehow decide to have them alternate back and forth between China and the United States. I have heard that this occurs to immigrant Chinese children and that it messes with their identity as they struggle to form a definitive one. I know this is different, but do people also find it hypocritical how some Mainland Chinese celebrities also flock to Hong Kong to give birth, if they have the chance? For example, Hawick Lau and Yang Mi’s daughter was born in Hong Kong (highly publicized), as well as Huang Xiaoming and Angelababy’s (also highly publicized); they are all accomplished and successful actors/actresses in the Mainland, so why not just choose that as their children’s birthplace? It is a practical choice, and yet they forego it. Then they go online and express how patriotic they are, all while ensuring that their children have foreign citizenship elsewhere. In the end, their so-called allegiance is actually quite bogus; they really should avoid voicing political opinion in the end. EDIT: I think someone should tell Mainland Chinese celebrities who intend on giving birth in the U.S. to hold that thought, because Donald Trump is determined to remove birthright citizenship outright, and the law has recently changed that even children born abroad to American parents are no longer guaranteed citizenship themselves.
  • @emerald5forever Could be those snooty queen's English-speaking HK'ers who poke fun at HK/Chinese celeb's English.
  • @msxie0714 That sounds like textbook insecurity.
  • @hohliu I totally agree with you. It is immature and I bet that the people who are ridiculing him also have heavy accents/cannot even speak English themselves.
  • @rainbow28 I think it is specifically HKers who are criticizing him; they seem to be incredibly insecure about their accents and have been known to poke fun at HK/Chinese celebrities' English.
  • @coralie Exactly. I think people need to understand fluency in a language isn't just pronouncing things correctly, but also using correct grammar.
  • The guy is from HK, so of course he will speak with a HK accent; why are people obsessing over how good/bad his English is?
  • @emerald5forever Concentration camps according to western media, but 'vocation camps' according to china media. Who knows what's real and what's fake.
  • @msxie0714 There are supposedly concentration camps for ethnic minorities in China.
  • @m0m0 Lol, yeah, now that you mention it the person probably heard the slur somewhere but still managed to use it incorrectly; now (s)he not only looks ignorant but stupid as well. I gotta hand it to Jackson for being bigger person.
  • @m0m0 I would not say that. There are racist people in all groups, can't be helped.
  • @emerald5forever yeah, i heard that they are and so are japanese. i guess chinese are the most accepting ones?
  • @emerald5forever apparently whomever that made the comment can't even write in a foreign language without understanding the subtlety of his/her word choice. high-5 for jackson for the reaction, so on point.
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