• R.I.P to a great musician. He really was a great songwriter. I consider him on par with Joseph Koo in term of song production. He really contributed a lot to HK music industry.
  • He was really great as Fu Hong Suet in 'Black Sabre'. He was so dedicated in his role, he limped in the whole time in the series, and it's not an easy limp. It's exactly like describe in the book where he moved the good leg first and drag the bad leg forward. Even me watching him feel tired for him. Many other actors playing Fu Hong Suet just do away with the limp all together or do an easier limp.
  • @aplha123 That's the first thing I thought too. Those netizens are cyberbullying Victoria for not voicing her opinion/grief on public platform for a girl that died from cyberbullying. Such irony. Maybe Victoria just want to moan in private.
  • @kidd If my name in Chinese sounded like cow or pig, will I call myself cow or pig? Fish does not sound unique at all. It’s a common word but ridiculous for a name...
  • @dramas4me Her English name used to be Jasmine. She later adopted her "Fish" as her english name because her Chinese name sounds like 'fish' in Cantonese. Maybe she finds Fish more catchy and unique. As a celebrity, you want to be remembered. I wonder if Ekin and Chilam still answer to Dior and Julian. I knew them by these 2 English name first before they became more popularly known as Ekin and Chilam.
  • @kidd Those parents are just trying to be unique but special. Even more weird when reporters and fans call the baby by the nickname when it’s none of their business.
  • @kidd Back in ancient China when infant mortality rates were high, people were superstitious and feared that evil spirits would kill their children before they can grow up. Parents would select an unpleasant name, in order to ward off demons who might wish to harm the child such as “dog’s leftovers,” or 'stinky egg” so that they wouldn’t care to pay attention to a child who is so “lowly.” Nowadays, parents will use cute or fashionable nickname.
  • I notice that 90% of chinese celebs give their new baby a food nickname (dumpling, glutinous rice etc) nowadays. Is this trend only among celebs or non-celeb parents also do this? Is there a specific reason for this naming practice or parents do it just because it's trendy? To my knowledge, the first celeb who did it was Kelly Chen. When Kelly Chan first did it, it's cute and novel. But now that everyone is doing it, it is just weird.
  • @jimmyszeto He did look lack of confidence and quiet in the interview he did with his other 'crab' brothers. But, in the one to one interview he did with reporter about his business, he's ok. He sounds calm and know what he's doing. He has good business sense too. Yeah, I've read about his debts too. I'm happy that he has turned around and learn another good skill (cooking) to survive. I'm watching 'Thief of Honour' and his acting his really good in it. Too bad he didn't make it as well as his brother.
  • @kidd Yeh. Ng Kai Ming looks like he has been through a lot through the years. He seems slow and nothing like the confident characters he used to play onscreen. I know that real life and TV characters can be totally different but there has been rumours he made a lot through stocks and shares during the boom and possibly lost it back. I expected someone who invested in shares to be very confident. Anyway, from his recent interview it seems that he has either become very camera shy or his confidence is shot. He’s the opposite of David Siu who still speaks arrogantly with confidence. David also lost a fortune on shares and repeatedly recommends people to not get involved in them.
  • Jacqueline lucked out. HK citizens have bigger concerns to focus one. Their righteous anger towards her has been directed elsewhere.
  • Recent news has said that business at Ng Kai Ming's restaurant has dropped 90% due to the ongoing protest. I wonder if he still has the same sentiments regarding the protestors has before (when he was supportive of them). Btw, I'm shocked at how he looks now. He looks nothing like his younger days. If someone just show me this picture (check the link below) without the accompanying article, I wouldn't know it's him. https://hk.on.cc/hk/bkn/cnt/entertainment/20190826/bkn-20190826000129730-0826_00862_001.html
  • @anon I've watched the youtube you suggested. I understand what's the guy is saying about the problem with Shang Chi, but, for Marvel's first Chinese superhero, there really is no other better choice. Of all the few Chinese superheroes Marvel has, Shang Chi is the most well known and has the longest history. Others are either newly created or obscure/seldom used. They can use Jimmy Woo, who is a very good representation of a Chinese hero, but he was ruined in the 'Ant Man and the Wasp' movie when they made him into bumbling idiot. But, Marvel can still retract and said the bumbling is all an act to cover his real identity as the leader of the Agents of Atlas.
  • @kidd yup. Back then when there are wars everywhere, patriotism is real because they really do believe it in. But these days, no one really believes in their own government, there is nothing at stake but money! So it’s very naive to think these celebrities gives 2 cent about silly things like a city must be labelled properly >_>
  • @littlefish I agree. I don't think any Chinese actors who cut ties with lucrative overseas business due to political issue are really patriotic. They just know where the biggest money are and who are the real patrons. If they don't do this, they can be boycott and lambasted by Chinese audience/netizen and get blacklist by Chinese government. I remember an academic person said of all the actors in China, he most respects Li Bing Bing because she refused to promoted 'Residential Evil' in Japan due China's political issue with Japan (they were fighting over an island at that time). Uh, I think Li Bing Bing just has a shrewd mind to know what the most appropriate action to take at that time.
  • @kidd It's a fact that critics have been paid to criticize films/dramas/actors. Overzealous fan-atics have also been known to mount campaigns against actors/actresses they consider a threat to their own idols. This also happens in S. Korea and in HK during the 70s.
  • "The apology statement also mentioned the possibility that certain netizens and critics are being paid to criticize the film. An official investigation will be opened. " This is the first time I hear a producer out and out claims that critics are paid to criticise his film. He should just accept that his film failed to connect with audience and do a postmortem on it instead of putting the blame on conspiracy and sabotage.
  • @anon He did not work for Viu TV. He worked with Viu TV. He has his own production company where some of his shows are in collaboration with Viu TV or broadcast in Viu TV. But, he uses web as his main platform. Most of his shows are aired online. They are actually quite popular.
  • @kidd It's ok to have a Chinese villain as long as he's not depicted like the racist and hideous caricature of FuManchu.
  • @kidd Yup, I watched the same video too. I was surprised that most of the comic con fans know who Tony Leung is unless you've been following his films for decades because let's be honest here, most of his recent work pales in comparison to his earlier work.
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