• @llwy12 I haven't watched the film, Tarantino should just apologise.
  • Tarantino is nothing but a racist loser. By claiming that he “heard” Bruce Lee say stuff like that, Tarantino proves that he is a liar, as he was only like what, 10 years old when Bruce Lee was alive and he never “knew” him or was around him. Bruce’s students such as Dan Inosanto and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar – now, what THEY say is actually true, as they actually KNEW Bruce, learned from him, hung out with him (of course, Bruce’s family too, who knew the “real” him better than anyone). Also, Tarantino was plain lazy with his response, trying to attribute a quote to Linda Lee when she wasn’t even the one who said it – do some damn research before you open your mouth, Quentin!! Btw, Kareem actually wrote a really nice piece in THR about the controversy, which I think sums up the sentiments of Bruce’s fans perfectly: https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/kareem-abdul-jabbar-bruce-lee-was-my-friend-tarantinos-movie-disrespects-him-1232544
  • @llwy12 Let's not forget even China's own favorite company, Huawei committed the same mistake. They are now under fire because their phones categorized Taiwan as a country. The Chinese nationalists are getting ridiculous. Even though I work for a US MNC, I try to be careful when speaking about our HK and Taiwan financials. As much as possible, I call them "markets", and not "countries". Never know whom among my coworkers could be a CCP fanboy.
  • @llwy12 wow, your knowledge! Thanks for all the explanations :) and [email protected] “undermining china’s sovereignty”! XD
  • @littlefish Exactly, lol. Actually, if we want to really get nit-picky, the Coach shirt technically does have an “error” on it as it pertains to the U.S. – it listed Orange County, USA….Orange County isn’t a city – it’s a county in California comprised of 34 different cities, with each city unique in its own right (and geographically it’s not right either, since people who live in the OC area don’t actually put that in their addresses)….so if we reverse apply China’s logic, whichever OC city that Coach was referring to technically doesn’t exist as a city themselves (oh, the outrage!!!)….so maybe they should go boycott Coach then and demand to be added to the shirt in order to validate their existence as a city?
  • @khuekhueloves I get it…yes, it was a mistake and sure, Versace should be called out on it….not disputing that fact at all. And yes, they should fix the mistake, especially if they are intending to sell the product (which they already did fix it from what’s i read). The part that I feel is overboard is to say that by making a mistake on their T-shirt design, Versace is “undermining China’s sovereignty” and therefore their apology should not be accepted (which is essentially what the government’s mouthpiece via their media is saying). To say that Versace’s designers were “ignorant” – yes, of course, because they were….we can even say they were being “culturally insensitive” if we want to go there…but to politicize it by saying they are “undermining China’s sovereignty”….really? Does the opinion of some Italian fashion designer really matter that much?
  • @prettysup1 Point well-made and taken. It was a bad comparison on my part – I apologize.
  • @llwy12 Wow wow wow first time I hear that Singapore is not a country? Please get your facts right, Singapore is officially an INDEPENDENT COUNTRY since it separated from Malaysia in 1965, with both Malaysia and Singapore in agreement on this, so no controversy here. It is totally different from the China-Taiwan relationship.
  • @llwy12 oh god... I don’t see people get upset when New York, LA get mentioned without a - USA next to it? If HK and Taiwan just be by itself, it should not even matter!
  • @llwy12 thank for explaining. I think the case of your co-worker and boss is understandable - I get it now - but if a big brand makes it in their products (like Versace did) and sells them all over - again, with my Hawaii and US example - will American people and the the Authority brush it off like it was nothing? Well I'm not even Chinese, I just think businesses should respect other countries and invest in more research to get the right fact.
  • @littlefish And just when we thought it couldn’t get any worse...from this Versace issue, we already know that referring to Hong Kong as a separate country is a “sin” in China’s eyes, but now, NOT deliberately calling out Hong Kong as a part of China is a “sin” too. Another major brand, Coach, is under fire now because they have a similar shirt as the Versace one, but instead of Hong Kong-Hong Kong, they simply listed Hong Kong by itself (no country or anything next to it, which to be honest, is how most companies refer to HK), which once again pissed off Mainland netizens and now another Mainland celebrity who was the ambassador for Coach is cutting ties with them because of that. If this continues, Chinese celebrities will have to cut ties with the entire world pretty much, lol...
  • @littlefish Yup, that’s exactly it! They want the world to know that everyone must acquiesce to their demands, no matter how unreasonable. I sure hope that designer doesn’t lose their job over this (if China puts enough pressure on Versace, that might be the next step)...it would be a shame for someone to lose their livelihood over an honest mistake like that. I have no clue what Italy’s labor laws look like (or if they even exist) but if that does happen and there’s the ability to take legal action, then I sure hope the designer takes it!
  • @sassy Well-said! :-) You mentioned Singapore, which is technically a “city-state” (not a country) that used to be under Malaysia and prior to that, was a British colony. So if we apply China’s logic, Malaysian government should technically be having a conniption every time someone refers to Singapore as “a country” even though they separated decades ago (just like China has a conniption every time some one refers to Taiwan — another island state — as a country, even though Taiwan has been independent from China for decades as well)....similar situation in other countries, yet most of them don’t react with such paranoia to a simple “country” reference.
  • @llwy12 not so many Chinese people can understand that commonsense, the honest mistake that you mentioned, but that Chinese for you. HK and Taiwan have been on their own for so long that most people think of them as a separate country from China. Even now with HK has gone back to China, but the mentality, the government, regulation is so far from China that people still think of them as a separate entity from China! Tbqh, the whole “controversy” wouldn’t be that big of a blow up, if it wasn’t for the usual jumpy Chinese netizens, they really need to learn to chill! And the apology is insincere because they used weibo only? The main audience that the apology go to is the mainland Chinese who used weibo, so the platform is correct. What the netizens ask for is face! The company needs to make the apology knows to the whole world, make it known how they have to bow their head to the all mighty China! For a simple honest mistake >_>
  • @khuekhueloves He would react the same way — which is, brush it off as an honest mistake....because at the end of the day, that’s what it was. And that’s exactly my point — when someone makes the mistake of referring to HK or Macau as a country, why do Mainlanders always have to see it as a deliberate assault to China’s sovereignty rather than as the honest mistake that it usually is? People’s Daily actually published an article claiming that through their actions, Versace is supporting HK and Macau independence and therefore their apology shouldn’t be accepted — even though technically Versace did more than just apologize, they also destroyed all the existing inventory that had this “mistake” on it, which if anyone knows anything about running a business, is a costly move that will no doubt affect their bottom line, which means it will also impact them financially....so it’s not like they aren’t already paying for their “honest mistake”... In terms of the U.S. and my comment above...to be honest, no one over here really cares if someone were to call one of the states (in your example, Hawaii) a country — the most people over here would do is probably laugh at the person for being ignorant....they definitely wouldn’t look at it as “an assault to our national pride” (as China does with its territories). Case in point — our legislature over here in California has been pushing for the state’s secession from the U.S. for at least a decade already (with the “urgency” ramped up since Trump became President) and you know what Washington’s (federal government’s) take on this is? California is welcome to secede as long as they follow the process of getting enough signatures to get the motion on the ballot and its citizens vote to do so...of course, whether California would be able to sustain itself economically as its own country is a whole other story, but the fact of the matter is the federal government won’t / can’t stand in the way if the people vote for it to happen....
  • @llwy12 I'm not sure I understand your comment 100% but I feel that your co-worker and boss are both American (I suppose) then it's ok for this mistake but Versace is a big brand which makes profit by selling their products all around the world, they should not make a mistake like this (HK is indeed a part of China) - I read somewhere Capri wants to expend the market in China. I wonder If your co-worker stated Hawaii as a country (not a part of the US) then how your boss would react?
  • That’s Mainland for you....bullying at its finest, lol! Some of the Beijing-leaning media outlets we’re even harsher, claiming that Versace was trying to undermine China’s sovereignty because putting them as separate countries mean that they (Versace) supports HK and Macao independence. Go figure! Honestly, it’s just some ignorant designer who made an honest mistake...it happens...the fact the China is making such a big deal out of it shows their insecurity with their own so-called policies. Just to show how common this type of mistake is....the other day, one of my co-workers also ignorantly called HK a country when he was presenting a slide — he’s an I.T. guy (non-Asian) who is smart as heck when it comes to numbers and tech stuff but obviously ignorant when it comes to geography (he also spelled some stuff wrong in his slides so obviously not a good speller either, lol)....so should my boss fire him now because he “disrespected” 1.4 billion Mainlanders by calling HK a country? If my boss were from Mainland (which he’s not thankfully), most likely he would fire the guy, but then he would also get his pants sued off because this is the U.S. and California especially has strict labor laws that prevents crap like that.
  • @jjwong Yup…and it’s not just that – China already said that any HK artist who attends the awards will be put on some type of blacklist….oh and let’s not forget the travel ban to Taiwan as well...so they basically don’t want any association whatsoever with Taiwan. Don’t be surprised if sooner or later, even saying the word “Taiwan” will be forbidden too, lol.
  • @jjwong Haha...don’t know about the dancing part but I saw the clip of Kenneth singing and it was definitely cringeworthy! Come on, Kenneth - I like you and all but please stick to your day job! Thank you! :-)
  • @llwy12 Did you ever read about Reagan sending in tanks to quell demonstrations by UC Berkeley protesters in the late 60s? The well-armed troops fired and killed a guy who was just watching the tear-gassed crowds from a roof. Four students were shot and killed by the National Guard at Kent State in in 1970. During a 2011 occupy movement at UC Davis, cops pepper-sprayed a group in the face as they sat on the ground. Not to mention the many incidents of un-armed minority males shot in the back with a fusillade of police firepower.
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