• @marquis Maybe in the West, the thinking is different. You will get almost no one in England decide to put a foreign name such as a Spanish or French name on a child. Nadal has been adored by millions for fans all over the world for well over a decade for his fighting ability and achievements on a tennis court but not many have named their sons after him outside of Spain and you wonder why. It's not that Kevin is inspired and have broken boundaries with this sudden flash of genius. It is that people consider carefully before naming a child. Apart from the weird nature of using one of those names, the unnecessary trouble of having the child explain to every person he meets on why he has such a name is already a nuisance. If a child is bullied, he may not go directly go asking the mother why and then listen,then understand the beautiful story of how the name originated, then be filled with passion and inspiration from the mother's story. Most bullying or depression goes undetected by parents until it's too late. Like I said, as a parent all i'm worried about is for my child to fit in comfortably with others and enjoy a carefree childhood. My responsibility is not to provide them with piles of money nor names to help them stand out amongst others. It is to provide a platform for him/her to progress at her own pace comfortably and hopefully this basis is enough for him/her to develop and achieve good things on his own merit....
  • @rowrowpower everyone is entitled to their own opinions which is why I often visit this website not only for the entertainment content, but also for the different views which makes the article more interesting. However, when certain comments are purely so subjective to the point where it intrudes people’s beliefs, social, political, religious etc..is when the discussion turns “ugly.” Also I don’t see any issues if someone were to ask if I was Spanish, even if I was ethnic Chinese with a Spanish name. Nor would I be offended if someone assumed I was Japanese, Korean etc. It’s part of socializing and people are curious by nature... However, to imply that such a name was pretentious, ridiculous or embarrassing is clearly more offensive than just asking someone’s ethnic background. Because, when was the last time you heard name calling - kindergarten? Just wanted to also add that I respect “jimmy” for strongly defending his views. You need both sides of the coin to make a discussion interesting and I look forward to more of his posts.
  • @firenationazula ok, that would explain the severity of deformity and also easier transition to martial arts. I did some light reading, and apparently surgery may not always correct the problem and bunions can reappear over time again.
  • @firenationazula ok, that would explain the easier transition to martial arts. I did some light reading, and apparently surgery may not always correct the problem and bunions can reappear over time again.
  • @marquis she did ballet when she was younger as well.. her foot looks so painful!
  • I have friends who have bunions due to wearing high heels (tight fitting shoes) for many years. Michelle’s case is very severe due to her martial arts career. I wonder why she never opted for surgery to correct her bunions.
  • @marquis As I parent, all I worry about is how my children fits into society and for them to be comfortable. Not interested in where names originate from. The current trend of names is what is most important. I'm not going to hand out a bizarre name to my child and let him fend off bullies if they happen to appear...
  • @jimmyszeto if you care to look up some baby naming websites, all names stem from some sort of ethnic origin. Your name - assuming it is “Jimmy” is Hebrew/Latin. How do we not know that 20 years from now, Rafael will be as common as Peter, Paul or Henry? Would it be more appropriate if all Chinese people had Chinese sounding names, or would that be wierd as well? Although we are all entitled to our own opinions, please don’t reprimand the parents for choosing a name that that was not primarily more “English sounding.” Although did you know that the majority of English words came from Latin and Greek roots? Also, the only time a child would be embarrassed of their name, is if they were surrounded by classmates with close minded parents who condoned ridicule or name calling on someone who did not fit the status quo. If the child was raised to be confident individuals, why would they see their name to be any different from their friend Steve or John? No need to be so self conscious over a name, it doesn’t define who you are as a person. It’s how you portray confidence in yourself and how you respect others, which will in turn earn respect from other people.
  • @jimmyszeto if you care the look up some of the baby naming websites, you will see that every name stems from some sort of ethnic orgin. In fact, if you look up your name assuming you are in fact “Jimmy” the origin is Latin/Hebrew. How do we not know 20 yrs from now the name “Rafael” will be as common as Peter, Paul or Mary..? We are all entitled to our own opinions, but please don’t condemn the parents for choosing a name that they feel is unique regardless of their ethnic origins. Also, the only time the child would be embarrassed of their own “name,” is if their classmates were brought up by close minded parents who condoned name calling and ridicule just because they were Asian, but possessed a Spanish, Greek, Italian name etc. Why would the child be embarrassed of their name, if they were always raised to be confident individuals in both home and school.
  • @marquis They aren't closely connected either so he won't have this feeling. Not physically, emotionally nor spiritually....
  • @jimmyszeto ok my bad for incorrectly spelling the 2nd ranked player in the world..and obviously the Ninja turtle comment was sarcasm. But my point was, there isn’t anything wrong with choosing a name which you feel closely connected to, whether it be a favorite sports player, grandparent or even a fruit...
  • As for shotgun weddings or announcing surprise pregnancies shortly after the wedding (because we can all perform basic math and guess when the child was actually conceived) May be conditions which were to satisfy their management companies or show respect towards family elders. HK society still sees this subject as taboo. How often do we “assume” a family is married when they have children? If we refer to the spouse as a “partner” we suspect their sexual orientation, and if we refer refer them as boyfriend/girlfriend we assume the father does not want to commit to marriage.
  • @marquis It's Rafael. Read the title please or watch some tennis...
  • Am I the only one who doesn’t see any issue with the name Raphael? It’s the parent’s choice to name their child whatever they feel appropriate. The parents don’t have to be Spanish, because god knows how many uncles, brothers, husbands and cousins are already named Raphael in one Spanish family alone. My daughter’s name is of Greek origin, because I admire the meaning behind the name - wisdom, strength and she certainly bears both these qualities. There are too many Aidan, Ethan, and Lucas’ in one class already, and many parents rack their brains trying think of something unique for their child. Times have changed, as parents who are now more educated are more creative in choosing unique names vs the conventional ones. I’m still indifferent to names like Apple,Saint and North - but those aren’t my children. And if it’s good enough for the Ninja Turtles, it’s good enough for Kevin & Grace.
  • Interested to see how she will physically portray this legendary singer. Currently I don’t see a resemblance. Looks alone, Charlene Choi bears a better resemblance to Teresa Tang IMO.
  • @marquis microwave radiation & upper atmosphere radiation are not the same. if anyone ever uses Geiger counter while they're up in the air, they'll notice the extreme spike in radiation when they're there. it's a thing, you can youtube it. anyways, i wouldn't recommend women do any types of babymoon that requires air travel. but that's me and my opinion. your take on it is that it's safe. to each their own.
  • @sugadough I think Linda is pretty since she has the friendly “girl next door look.” Bernice is more of a sophisticated prettiness. Both are pretty in their own way, but Linda seems to have a happier family, love life now.
  • @coralie doesn’t the article state that the risks are inconclusive? They don’t want you travelling in your last mth in case you go into labour earlier. But in terms of risks such as radiation, I think it’s no different from standing in front of a microwave lol. Howver, if you are labelled as a high risk pregnancy, then all flight should be avoided. But then, I’m sure her doctor probably gave her the green light to fly since as first time parents they will probably be more cautious.
  • @mike not sure if it matters whether she blocks his face or not. Anybody that knows her already knows what her husband looks like. It was the most discussed topic, when she had a flash marriage to someone with more “mature” looks.
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