• @goodday Have you ever read the history of how HK got taken over by the British? You're probably ignorant about the fact that the queen appointed all the governors of HK. Go to the US or Britain and disrupt their airports If you want to experience a taste of real police brutality. You sound like a very young zealot with no knowledge of world history or current events on a crusade to destroy HK's economy and livelihoods.
  • @miyabi LOL! younger guys are easier on the eyes and usually more supportive of women than old and wrinkled elders. $ is notthe object, since she makes plenty herself.
  • @wm2017 the 'guy' on the left actually is an actress dressed as a male.
  • @rika Hard to believe wealth is no longer high priority in HK. Making money has always been the motivation of HK'ers and people in general everywhere.
  • @hohliu Recommend you watch c-drama Longest Day in Chang'an available on Youtube and Amazon Prime. African-american actor Djimon Hounsou has a good role in this historical drama. And the leading man Lei Jiayin looks like Simu Lu. Chinese stereotyping and racism in casting western actors pales in comparison to the long history of racist caricatures of Asians in Hollywood [email protected] 16 Candles, Breakfast at Tiffany's, Big Trouble in Little China, Mummy: Tomb of Dragon Emperor- a small list among the many.
  • Not wrapping himself in a British flag and pledging allegiance to the Queen surely hurt the feelings of protesters. It's a precarious situation for celebrities to take a stand without incurring the wrath or praise of opposing sides.
  • @jjwong The hate-mongering isn't coming only from Chinese netizens. There's be plenty of 'she's so ugly.....he's so ugly" in reference to Awkwafina, Simu and other celebrities by non-mainlanders here on this forum.
  • @msxie0714 Don't even get me started on the US and Israeli connection. This is an entertainment blog after all. :D
  • @kidd It's a fact that critics have been paid to criticize films/dramas/actors. Overzealous fan-atics have also been known to mount campaigns against actors/actresses they consider a threat to their own idols. This also happens in S. Korea and in HK during the 70s.
  • @anon The history of China from the mid-19th century was traumatic for a weakened country invaded and plundered by rising European powers with big ammos. In some ways, they react like the Israelis who swore 'NEVER AGAIN' to past humiliations and persecution. While the US is much more sympathetic to Israel, China is not surprisingly demonized.
  • @msxie0714 Uhm, no? I don’t shame her for not kowtow to the west, but at the same time, let’s call a spade a spade. If it wasn’t for the pressure from Chinese netizens, she wouldn’t cut tie with a lucrative deal. Let’s be real, YM is a very good business woman, I doubt she gives 2 cents about patriotism. So my sentence is just what it is, but her fans just can’t take that :)
  • @littlefish Shame on her for being patriotic. Why can't she be like those Chinese who kowtow and submit to the west.
  • @llwy12 Did you ever read about Reagan sending in tanks to quell demonstrations by UC Berkeley protesters in the late 60s? The well-armed troops fired and killed a guy who was just watching the tear-gassed crowds from a roof. Four students were shot and killed by the National Guard at Kent State in in 1970. During a 2011 occupy movement at UC Davis, cops pepper-sprayed a group in the face as they sat on the ground. Not to mention the many incidents of un-armed minority males shot in the back with a fusillade of police firepower.
  • @msxie0714 The U.S. never cares about the consequences. Just look at their record on regime changes globally, particularly in the middle east. They invade, conquer, rape their resources, form a puppet government then leave. They never rebuild the local infrastructures of war-torn countries that they've destroyed. This is why there's so much commotion in Venezuela and Iran at the moment. They have some of the the largest supply of proven oil reserves. The U.S. tried to overthrow Maduro with a puppet government. Failed. Now the US sanctions Venezuela from doing business with any other countries while freezing all of their assets in the USA. This is economic terrorism - plain and simple. The US has no rights to interfere in the internal affairs of other countries no matter how they feel about that government. The days of the USA being a world police is over. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_involvement_in_regime_change
  • @anon If destabilization of China succeeds, the country will see civil war and rioting on a massive scale that will spill over into the rest of Asia. Those hoping for the break-up of China had better think of the consequences and be ready to take in loads of refugees.
  • @m0m0 Asian celeb complexions are whiter than white people.
  • @jimmyszeto Hasn't HK always been about making money? they've been famous for pursuing wealth, scorning poor mainlanders even before they got on the capitalist road.
  • @msxie0714 No need to keep bringing up those protests from the 60s because the HK protestors today already know about those — in fact, there has been repeated coverage in the media about that particular history (and not just those, but all of the protests that had ever occurred in HK over the past few decades) and there have even been calls from the public for Carrie Lam herself (and her cronies in government) to study those protests so they can see how the British government handled the aftermath....I saw an article that even broke down action by action how the British government responded and compared to the current protests, how Carrie Lam’s administration responded (and also strongly urged her to “learn from” what the British did, lol). And yes, those types of issues are endemic in most cities, but that doesn’t mean Hong Kongers should just accept it. Just like we have the right to protest injustices we see here in the U.S., Hong Kongers have every right to protest the same injustices occurring in their own city. To me, it’s a moot point to keep trying to imply that the protestors’ anger at their government is unjustified because the things they are angry about happen in other countries as well — it’s completely irrelevant....and it’s also pointless to keep bringing up the protests that occurred decades ago under British rule because, unlike what China did with Tiananmen Square (and what they are doing now with the current unrest in HK), Britain didn’t try to erase those events from their history books, not did they try to “brainwash” their entire population (and I am including HK here) into believing that those events never happened. All of that history has not only been widely talked about the past 2 months, it is also being used as a lesson for the current protests (which, to be honest, is what should be done with all history— we should be learning from it so we don’t commit the same horrific mistakes). So as far as I see it, no matter which way people try to slice and dice things (whether for or against China), I’ll still believe what I believe about the current situation in HK based on everything I know from history as well as what I see / read from various news sources (within HK and outside of it) and, more importantly, from my relatives and friends currently living in HK (who have been giving us nearly daily rundowns of everything that’s happening over there as a way to cope and vent). Everyone’s opinion of what has been happening will undoubtedly be different, which is fine — the important thing is to fully understand the whole story (including the relevant history and background involved) first before taking sides....just my two cents...
  • @llwy12 HK'ers should realize that problems of housing shortages and the high cost of living are endemic in major cities around the world. Protesters nostalgic for the old days should also study history to learn that sedition laws under British rule were strictly enforced and demonstrations were banned. Those who did protest during the 60s were dealt with harshly, unlike the relative leniency shown now. That being said, China definitely has to take the blame for the hostility and inconvenience caused by mainlanders' insensitivity toward the locals.
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