• @orchid123 Yes...that’s the first thing they will ask. Have you got Italian/Spanish/French blood? And if the answer is ‘no’, the perception of you will not be good. For a adult then they can handle it but for a young child, he may feel inferior and out of place.That’s how it is because some countries are unique and names only trend in their home countries.
  • @orchid123 Thumbs up! Someone finally understands what I’m trying to say through their experiences....
  • Would you people like to hear about my personal experience about a name? I am a Hong Kong Chinese, but have moved to live in Canada too long ago. I have an Italian name as my English name, and a Chinese name given by my mother. As a typical Hongkonger, everyone wants to have a name that nobody else has. When I started high school, the principal (many of our teachers were foreigners from overseas who could not pronounce Chinese names) required all students to have English names. I picked my English name (I did not know it is an Italian name) with the help of my cousin. I thought it was great because I was always the only student and person having this name. However, when I grew up and moved to Canada, people here asked me if I were Italian in descent and how I got my Italian name. Was my mother Italian or ancestor Italian? I don't think I look Italian at all!! On top of that, it is hard to pronounce my name properly. I need to write it out or spell it for people to say it correctly. Or I will be called by some other similar names incorrectly. I hate it. After I got married, many of my friends give up calling me by my first name, they just call me Mrs. xxx.. Or they don't even call my name at all. I have no one to blame but myself. I purposely picked an uncommon name. Thank God, it is still a proper name (though not English), unlike Rock, Silly, Rain, Sugar, Penny, Miles, Money, Cash, Sissy, Manly, etc. If I did not have my name since high school, I might have changed it after I moved to Canada. I always tell people that I don't like my first name as it is not a typical and easy-to-pronounce English name. When I had my son, I just gave him a simple English name to make sure he will not have my bad experience.
  • @nomad822 I don't disagree with you. Year 1 in university in North America is very similar to A level in the UK system, but not quite in Year 2. For piano examinations, I cannot comment on them. It is true that we have 10 grades in Royal Conservatory Examinations, plus Performance and Teaching Certificate, while there are only 8 grades in the UK system. In a way, why does the North American educational system waste extra years of a kid's precious time to stay in school for a longer time studying the same subjects while kids in UK/Australia can start working and making money at the age of 22. All graduates in professional programs in North America are at least 24 years old and up and 33 for a neuro-surgeon when they start their first full-time job in their professions.
  • @orchid123 I was schooled in BOTH systems: 1) Singapore up to O and A Levels (ie junior college or pre-Uni) 2) Canada (ie the NAmerican system) for University. The NAmerican system Yr 1 and 2 are very very easy - it's akin to even O Levels = mildly A Levels. I I also took Piano beyond Gr 8 level, up to Teacher's Diploma (UK - ATCL)level back home, It's only the Associate Diploma, not the Licentiate Diploma (harder to get). And I would say even at Gr 8 and ATCL level (UK) ... their Theory and History knowledge expectations are higher than the Gr 10 Toronto Conservatory expectations, and higher than Yr 1 and 2 University Music Dept expectations. Which is why - a UK degree (they only have that many Uni) can be held in higher esteem than US degree back in my time. Esp those from Oxford and Cambridge (2 cohorts made it to Cambridge). Even if you don't make the grade for Uni in NAmerica; it's so easy to slip into a community college, boost your grades to As (also very easy) .... transfer, and still get into a decent NAmerican uni. Or there are tons and tons of US colleges and unis ... all of which award degrees. Which makes it all kind of 'dubious', since standards so far LESS stringent.
  • @elizabeth The educational system is very different in UK from the ones in North America (USA and Canada). In UK, Hong Kong, Australia and maybe some other Commonwealth countries, you get admitted to any university programs from the Advanced Level of GCE (matriculation graduated). In North America, you need to get your first degree (B.A. or B.Sc.) first before you can get admitted to any professional programs, such as Medicine, Dentistry, Law, Optometry, Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy, etc., and 1 to 2 years to get a Master's degree after the Bachelor's degree. Students in the UK are luckier than the ones in North America. They don't need to go to university for such a long time and have more time to make money.
  • @orchid123 No. It’s saying his “portion” of the total $40 billion inheritance comes in the form of $2 million a month. So he’s getting $2 million a month for life basically...not sure what the other family members are getting but they will have an allowable monthly amount as well.
  • @llwy12 Am I correct in understanding your statement that "Julian Hui can receive a portion of it monthly from a total of $2 million"?
  • I guess it is very hard to have everyone like every artiste. However, in my personal opinions, Charmaine Sheh acted very well in the past few years. She is definitely one of the top ones from TVB. If someone has prejudice against a certain artiste, no matter how hard/good she acts, she will always get criticisms. On the other hand, if the artiste is one of your favourite ones, you will always accept all her flaws and the barely-acceptable acting.
  • Based on the above photos of Linda's Chung's children, both looked very much like their father.
  • Based on the photos above, I like Telford Wong the most. He is the handsomest one among the five, and is tall and has a good built physically. He looks very sharp with his eyes. If he learns how to act well, he has a lot of potential to move up to 1st lead roles in 1 or 2 years' time with the current TVB's shortage of actors.
  • We can tell more if those actresses don't wear any makeup. They will show their skin, eyes, wrinkles more clearly. Also time has changed. A lot of women still look very good at their 40s now, unlike our parents and grandparents years ago. Women usually show them aging now at age 60s.
  • @funnlim I believe that the solid reason for her choosing to take the Bar exam in NY is because of the State's leniency to foreign lawyers and as @orchid123 stated, requires a few years less of schooling. Louisa knows very well that she is not a good actress and no beauty by any means... will she make a dramatic improvement to become a GREAT actress in the next 5-10 years remains to be seen. So, obtaining her law degree and license to practice is a back up plan. Smart girl. However, just because she has a license to practice is not all so glamorous as it sounds, she needs experience under her belt, and if she remains an actress in HK, she will lack working experience and will end up working for the government or small firm with low salary. It takes years and years of practice and many cases won before achieving the acclaimed status and high paying salary of a lawyer.
  • @funnlim Louisa said she got a 2nd class honours in her law degree. But I agree with you that her renowned university, University of Cambridge, might have made the difference.
  • @orchid123 I don't think it's wrong if the baby is born before or after the parents get married, or even if there's no marriage at all. Marriage is just a ceremony humans created. As long as the 2 parents decided to stay and raise the baby together that is what matter. I do get what you meant though; that's how it was in the past and mostly in the present. Also, society does judge you.
  • @orchid123 Maybe special exemption due to superb results.
  • @orchid123 indeed that seems to be the trend. If they don't take precautions and then the woman gets pregnant, why do they feel that they have to hide the truth?
  • @passingby I think that is the trend and style now ....... get pregnant first and then marriage. Nothing wrong really as long as they get married before the baby is born.
  • @moseenaddict That is what I think too. A law degree in North America (Canada & USA) is a post-graduate degree (3 or 4 years after a bachelor's degree), while a law degree in UK and Hong Kong is only an undergraduate degree. Don't know why the New York Bar Exam. Board accepted her undergraduate degree in Law for bar exam. for a law practising licence. She had saved many years of study by doing that. A super smart woman!!
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