Chinese Historical, Idol Dramas Pulled Out of Broadcast for Remainder of 2019

By on August 1, 2019 in NEWS, TV Dramas

Chinese Historical, Idol Dramas Pulled Out of Broadcast for Remainder of 2019

In a public message sent out via WeChat, China’s broadcasting authority, the National Radio and Television Administration (NRTA), announced that it will temporarily pull the brakes on broadcasting historical and idol dramas this year, in celebration for the 70th anniversary of the establishment of “New China.”

The message, sent out on July 31, said the government will launch a 100-day celebration in honor of the 70th year establishment of the People’s Republic of China. The government has already selected 86 upcoming television dramas to fill out time slots across the nation. Starting August 1, dramas with “strong entertainment value” such as historical dramas and idol dramas will not be aired.

Among the 86 dramas that were chosen to air include The People’s Choice <人民的选择>, People’s Premier Zhou Enlai <人民总理周恩来>, The Rhythm of Endeavors <奋进的旋律>, Lovely China <可爱的中国>, and Courageous Turning Point <伟大的转折>, among others. The broadcasting authority emphasized that these dramas are high quality productions with “stand-out themes” and “rich topics” that can inspire, encourage, and uplift citizens, teaching that dreams can be achievable through positivity, dedication and hard work.

Source: HK01.com

This article is written by Addy for JayneStars.com.

JayneStars Media LLC reserves all copyrights. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. By using the JayneStars website, you accept and agree to our Terms and Conditions of Use.

Related Articles

  • No Related Posts.

  • 6 comments to Chinese Historical, Idol Dramas Pulled Out of Broadcast for Remainder of 2019

    1. coralie says:

      I guess China doesn’t care about generating revenue at a time when they’re strapped for money with the ongoing trade war….

      Whoever’s helming these decisions need to get fired. Only people who have too much time on their hands and is totally ignorant will make decisions that 1) harms the economy, 2) ignore the people and 3) make such a ridiculous excuse. If they want to brainwash their citizens, just cancel all broadcasted TV except mantras that promotes their own propaganda, for godsakes. Do it like N. Korea! That’s the way to go.

      Login or Register before you can reply to coralie
      • llwy12 replied:

        @coralie That has always been China’s mantra though. To them, making money isn’t as important as saving face and continuing to promote their Communist agenda (and blaming everyone but themselves for their country’s issues). They (the CCP / Mainland govt) are pretty much the only ones who don’t see the ridiculousness of their actions and words. It’s just like with this whole HK protest thing, the Mainland govt keeps insisting that the “evil Western nations” are the “black hands” behind the protests – one of the Beijing govt officials even outright said that the U.S. “instigated” the protests, and “forced” Hong Kongers to take to the streets to go against their mother country and therefore the U.S. “owes the entire world an explanation.” (so they are basically saying that Hong Kongers would never go against Mainland China on their own accord because they love their motherland so the fact that they are protesting must be due to outside forces rather than any wrongdoing or problems with the Mainland government). Seriously, anyone who believes the garbage that the Mainland govt spews out need to get their brains checked.

        Basically, Beijing views anyone in the West who makes any type of comment about anything going on in China or HK (whether it’s a positive comment or a negative one) as “meddling in China’s affairs” (yes, @coralie, from your one comment alone, in Beijing’s eyes, you are “meddling in China’s affairs” — you better not set foot in China because they might arrest you, lol…but hey, I’m right there with you, since by virtue of repeatedly criticizing the Mainland govt, I’ve pretty much committed treason, lol). It’s sad and pathetic, but that’s the way they’ve operated for the past 70 years and it’s not going to change— if anything, it’s just going to get worse…

        Login or Register before you can reply to llwy12
        • msxie0714 replied:

          @llwy12

          Didn’t some of the HK anti-china leaders like Jimmy Lai of Apple Daily plead for support from VP Pence in their face-to-face meeting.?
          Given the long history of destabilizing foreign governments by the US, it’s not implausible that exploiting the chaos in HK is part of the strategy of White House warhawks to take down China’s economy which is a threat to American supremacy and dominance.

          Login or Register before you can reply to msxie0714
        • llwy12 replied:

          @msxie0714 Yes, and there were others in HK who appealed to foreign governments for help, but that was all AFTER the protests had already started….so to say the U.S. and Britain and all the other Western nations “instigated” the protests doesn’t make sense. Now would they have taken advantage of the protests currently going on and exploit further to gain dominance — of course that’s possible, and most countries would do so…but taking advantage of something that’s already happening versus being the instigators of something that didn’t happen yet are 2 different things. Plus it’s obvious that China is trying to deflect blame for the protests to other countries so they don’t have to look inward and see that the problem seems actually stem from them, not other countries.

          There have been many analyses done over the past 2 months and it’s been concluded that the extradition bill and Carrie Lam’s actions were merely the catalyst for the protests — the deeper, underlying reason is really the accumulation of issues in HK society that the government has not bothered to address or resolve — for example, housing shortage, rising crime, basic necessities not being available, plus also government policies that favor Mainland visitors such as the allowance of parallel trading, prioritizing services to non-HK visitors, refusing to curb the influx of Mainland visitors, even when the situation was dire, such as when there were no hospital beds available for Hong Kongers in need of them in any of the hospitals due to pregnant women from the Mainland taking most of them up, etc. All of those are homegrown issues, governance issues (whether HK govt or Mainland govt) that they can’t blame Western countries for.

          Login or Register before you can reply to llwy12
        • msxie0714 replied:

          @llwy12

          HK’ers should realize that problems of housing shortages and the high cost of living are endemic in major cities around the world. Protesters nostalgic for the old days should also study history to learn that sedition laws under British rule were strictly enforced and demonstrations were banned. Those who did protest during the 60s were dealt with harshly, unlike the relative leniency shown now. That being said, China definitely has to take the blame for the hostility and inconvenience caused by mainlanders’ insensitivity toward the locals.

          Login or Register before you can reply to msxie0714
        • llwy12 replied:

          @msxie0714 No need to keep bringing up those protests from the 60s because the HK protestors today already know about those — in fact, there has been repeated coverage in the media about that particular history (and not just those, but all of the protests that had ever occurred in HK over the past few decades) and there have even been calls from the public for Carrie Lam herself (and her cronies in government) to study those protests so they can see how the British government handled the aftermath….I saw an article that even broke down action by action how the British government responded and compared to the current protests, how Carrie Lam’s administration responded (and also strongly urged her to “learn from” what the British did, lol).

          And yes, those types of issues are endemic in most cities, but that doesn’t mean Hong Kongers should just accept it. Just like we have the right to protest injustices we see here in the U.S., Hong Kongers have every right to protest the same injustices occurring in their own city. To me, it’s a moot point to keep trying to imply that the protestors’ anger at their government is unjustified because the things they are angry about happen in other countries as well — it’s completely irrelevant….and it’s also pointless to keep bringing up the protests that occurred decades ago under British rule because, unlike what China did with Tiananmen Square (and what they are doing now with the current unrest in HK), Britain didn’t try to erase those events from their history books, not did they try to “brainwash” their entire population (and I am including HK here) into believing that those events never happened. All of that history has not only been widely talked about the past 2 months, it is also being used as a lesson for the current protests (which, to be honest, is what should be done with all history— we should be learning from it so we don’t commit the same horrific mistakes). So as far as I see it, no matter which way people try to slice and dice things (whether for or against China), I’ll still believe what I believe about the current situation in HK based on everything I know from history as well as what I see / read from various news sources (within HK and outside of it) and, more importantly, from my relatives and friends currently living in HK (who have been giving us nearly daily rundowns of everything that’s happening over there as a way to cope and vent). Everyone’s opinion of what has been happening will undoubtedly be different, which is fine — the important thing is to fully understand the whole story (including the relevant history and background involved) first before taking sides….just my two cents…

          Login or Register before you can reply to llwy12

    Leave a reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.