35th Hong Kong Film Awards: “Ten Years” Wins Best Film

By on April 3, 2016 in Hot Gossip!, Movies, NEWS

35th Hong Kong Film Awards: “Ten Years” Wins Best Film

The 35th Hong Kong Film Awards were successful held on Sunday, April 3, at the Hong Kong Cultural Center in Tsim Sha Tsui. Hosted by HKFA Best Actor winner Sean Lau Ching-wan (劉青雲), the ceremony honored and recognized the best films made by Hong Kong filmmakers in 2015.

Film King went to five-time nominee Aaron Kwok (郭富城), his first HKFA win as Best Actor. His Port of Call <踏血尋梅> costar, Jessie Li (春夏), won Best Actress. The first-time nominee was also nominated for Best New Performer, but she lost that award to costar Michael Ning (白只), who also won Best Supporting Actor. Best Supporting Actress went to veteran Taiwanese actress Elaine Jin (金燕玲), also from Port of Call.

Though Port of Call is acclaimed with high-caliber performances, the crime thriller did not win Best Film. The Best Film award went to the low-budget feature Ten Years <十年>, a movie that is set in a “darker” future where Hong Kong is under greater Chinese control. The picture is banned in Mainland China. Reportedly, China will also not be showing the broadcast of the Hong Kong Film Awards.

Ten Years win, however, was not without controversy in Hong Kong. Although it was a sleeper hit and a box office success, it was neither the highest-grossing nor the most successful film released in Hong Kong last year. Businessman and film investor Peter Lam (林建岳) said Ten Years, which was produced with a budget of only $600,000 HKD, lacked in many other technical areas and was not nominated in any other categories besides Best Film.

Ten Years win is unfair to many filmmakers,” said Lam. “It means the government has kidnapped professionalism. It politicalizes an awards ceremony about filmmaking.”

Check out the full list of winners below:

Best Film: “Ten Years”
Best Director: Tsui Hark for “The Taking of Tiger Mountain”
Best Screenplay: Philip Yung for “Port of Call”
Best Actor: Aaron Kwok for “Port of Call”
Best Actress: Jessie Li for “Port of Call”
Best Supporting Actor: Michael Ning for “Port of Call”
Best Supporting Actress: Elaine Jin for “Port of Call”
Best New Performer: Michael Ning for “Port of Call”
Best Cinematography: Christopher Doyle for “Port of Call”
Best Film Editing: Cheung Ka-fai for “Ip Man 3”
Best Art Direction: William Chang, Alfred Yau for “Office”
Best Costume Make Up Design: Kenneth Yee for “Monster Hunt”
Best Action Choreography: Nicky Li for “Ip Man 3”
Best Sound Design: Kinson Tsang, George Lee, Yiu Chun-hin for “The Taking of Tiger Mountain”
Best Visual Effects: Jason Snell, Ellen Poon, Tang Binding for “Monster Hunt”
Best Original Film Score: Lo Ta-yu, Keith Chan for “Office”
Best Original Film Song: “We Almost Fly” for “She Remembers, He Forgets”
Best New Director: Raman Hui for “Monster Hunt”
Best Film of Mainland China and/or Taiwan: “The Assassin”
Most Professional Award: Chow Wing-kwong
Lifetime Achievement Award: Li Li-hua
Best Dressed: Jacky Cheung, Karena Lam

Source: IHKTV

This article is written by Addy for JayneStars.com.

44 comments to 35th Hong Kong Film Awards: “Ten Years” Wins Best Film

  1. elizabeth says:

    I wanted to watch “Ten Years”. =(

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    • llwy12 replied:

      @elizabeth I do too! Do you live in HK? If so, they are actually showing the movie for free in a whole bunch of local venues all over HK. The producers and distributor were pretty much forced to go this route due to Mainland Chinese government ‘interference’ back in February when they ‘pulled some strings’ behind the scenes and ‘forced’ all of the theaters that were carrying the movie in HK to ‘remove’ it from their lineup.

      While it’s true that a low budget independent film with a relatively unknown cast and helmed by newbie directors can’t compare to the other big budget ‘commercial’ films with A-list casts and big-name directors that were nominated in the same category, I personally don’t see a problem with Ten Years winning — in fact, I’m happy for its win, especially knowing all the obstacles the movie’s production team had to overcome in order to even get to this point. And to be honest, I disagree with Peter Lam’s sentiments — who says that a film can only win Best Picture if it is “highest grossing” or “most successful”? If he has a problem with the film winning, then why doesn’t he go complain to the Mainland government and tell them to stop suppressing the arts in HK?

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      • kaykay408 replied:

        @llwy12 I do too! I don’t live in HK though. Do you know where I can watch it online?

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      • llwy12 replied:

        @kaykay408 So far, there isn’t an option to watch online.  I actually asked one of the Ten Years organizers on FB and they said for right now, there are no plans to show the movie online, since they’re working on getting the movie screened internationally and at various film festivals.   Of course, there are probably options out there to watch ‘unofficial’ versions of the movie, but personally, I prefer to wait for the ‘official’ version released by the actual Ten Years team.  There were originally no plans to release the movie on DVD either (last I heard was that they do want to release on DVD, but they “aren’t allowed to”….), but now with the HKFA win, things may change…

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      • phixster replied:

        @llwy12 I think it’s more a case of they aren’t allowed to release a DVD until the movie is screened internationally to make sure people go to the box office to watch the movie at the cinemas so they can make money (which is reasonable since it got such a limited screening)

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      • llwy12 replied:

        @phixster Actually, that was later. One of the directors of Ten Years had done an interview back in February right around the time the film was removed from theaters (prior to the international distributor picking the film up) — at the time, they had thought about releasing the movie straight to DVD, but there were no local distributors willing to work with them. The director said that they were told their chances of getting the film released on DVD were very slim and so they should just abandon the idea. Not long after that, an international distributor picked up the film and the plans were launched to do a marathon screening of the film…now that they will be screening the film internationally, it makes sense that the DVD option will be the last thing on their minds…

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      • llwy12 replied:

        @kaykay408 @elizabeth The production team of Ten Years released a statement today…apparently, someone had uploaded the movie to Youtube without getting the production team’s permission – not only that, the version uploaded was an incomplete version of the movie and not the ‘official’ version that had been in theaters.  They are working with Youtube to have the illegal version taken down, but they are also asking people to refrain from sharing the movie online (though of course, we all know that there are people out there who will still do it regardless).  So if anyone finds an online version of the movie, note that it is NOT the official version…those overseas who are interested in watching the movie should probably check Ten Years’ Facebook page for the latest updates on when the DVD will be released and also whether there will be any international screenings in other countries (they did do some screenings of the movie in Japan a few months back as part of one of the independent film festivals over there, so it’s still possible that other countries may pick the movie up too).

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      • elizabeth replied:

        @llwy12 Hey! I actually live in Australia! But I do have an interest in what happens in HK. But of they don’t release DVDs, then an overseas viewing is unlikely until a cinema like Hoyts or Village buys it.

        For the past few years, I am happy to see more attention being given to the smaller productions like “The Way We Dance:” instead of the big blockbusters who have already earned their full in the box office. I think it is encouraging to the new directors getting the spotlight too.

        I actually first found out about it while surfing youtube, Its trailer is short but effective at telling the story how life in HK is changing since the handover. I have wanted to watch it for ages. And the knowledge that most artistes either charged a lower price or acted for free just to take part in it sparked my interest even more.

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  2. jayne says:

    It’s finally Aaron Kwok’s turn to win HKFA Best Actor! Louis Koo should be next in line?

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    • llwy12 replied:

      @jayne Louis Koo? He’s a decent actor, but there are actually many actors who deserve to win more than him (and who have been nominated way more times too).

      I actually feel that the Best Actor category was pretty strong this year and all 5 actors deserved to win for their respective movies, though of course Aaron and Jacky were the hot favorites due to both being nominated multiple times previously and missing out each time. But at the end of the day, there can only be one winner….

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      • jayne replied:

        @llwy12 Louis Koo has been a solid pillar in HK films for years now. His films have been geared more towards box office than film festivals though. With a breakthrough role, I think he will have a good chance in winning HKFA….

        It seems to be the right time, as older actors in their 50s are taking more supporting roles and a need to pass on the accolades to slightly younger actors.

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    • aiya replied:

      @jayne
      This is the one “beef” I have against the HKFA: it is limited to such a small circle who takes turns to win unless you’re Jackie Chan who seems to have banned from winning.

      The Golden Horse is a bit broader and more prestigious for this purpose I guess.

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  3. llwy12 says:

    My favorite part of the entire ceremony was the tribute to former child actors (all of whom were also presenters for the Best Director award). For me, it brought back so many memories to see so many of the child actors I used to always watch in movies now all grown up…plus all the veteran artists who actually started acting as small children and are still in the industry even after so many years — I was actually quite moved by the dedication of these artists. The other highlight was getting to see all 3 Chiang brothers (John Chiang, Paul Chun, and Derek Yee) in the same show (too bad they couldn’t all be on the same stage, since Derek Yee didn’t end up winning the Director award).

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    • elizabeth replied:

      @llwy12 I have to saw, Derek Yee is looking more and more like Paul Chun as he gets older,.

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      • llwy12 replied:

        @elizabeth Lol…so true!  I always found it interesting that Derek looks so much more like Paul despite them having different fathers, while John and Paul don’t look as much alike, though their kids are pretty much replicas of each other based on looks (I actually mistook John Chiang’s son John John for Benji a few times, lol).  Speaking of the children, I thought it was so sweet of Benji and Lesley to accompany their dad to the ceremony — when the camera panned over to the 2 of them sitting in the audience with their cell phones recording the moment their dad came on stage (like proud parents recording their kid’s performance, haha), I literally went “Awwww!”

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  4. freedalas says:

    Boy! Am I glad that Sisley Choi didn’t win Best New Performer, it would have been a gross injustice.

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  5. phixster says:

    So I haven’t actually watched Ten Years (or any of the other movies) so what I’m going to say is based on second hand information from people who have and my own opinion.

    I thought that it was good that HKFA made a statement to China that they would not bow down and give in to the Government by nominating and eventually letting 10 years win the award (something that was repeated multiple times throughout the whole ceremony by everyone on stage). But is the film actually deserving? If it was in normal times Port of Call should have won for the performance and cinematography but because of the current political environment 10 years got the best film award. In this case isn’t politics interfering with entertainment industry? The standards of filming and acting are certainly not on par with or deserving of Best film (as the directors admitted themselves). If we are looking at the film itself it certainly shouldn’t have gotten the award.

    On the other hand – one might argue that film should reflect society and 10 years has managed to that and beyond. So in that respect it is a great film.

    The argument Peter Lam put forward isn’t entirely not without point – except for the box office part. That’s rubbish, if large cinema lines were actually allowed to pick up the film and the film was not pulled from the only 6 cinemas that were showing it only after 58 days, it would have made a lot more money.

    Well if anything, I hope the boycott from Mainland will actually help spur a return of “Hong Kong” movies since it is likely that Mainland collaborations will be less willing to invest now.

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    • kaykay408 replied:

      @phixster good if that happens!

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    • sasamii replied:

      @phixster Agree with all your points, I felt pretty conflicted too when I saw the win. In the end though, as a statement against Mainland censorship, and for HK solidarity, the film seems to have transcended its original status as just a piece of entertainment. That is pretty powerful.

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    • llwy12 replied:

      @phixster “Well if anything, I hope the boycott from Mainland will actually help spur a return of “Hong Kong” movies since it is likely that Mainland collaborations will be less willing to invest now.”

      I was initially thinking this too, but now seeing all the backlash at Ten Years’ win, not so sure anymore. Some big name HK directors and film people are now claiming that this is “the end” of HK movies because now Mainland is not going to want to invest. To me, the fact that so many HK film industry people are saying this kind of stuff tells me that HK has already gotten to the point that it must now rely on Mainland for the movie industry to survive — if Mainland doesn’t invest, then the HK movie industry is “dead”. So I guess this means that even HK filmmakers have very little interest in making purely “Hong Kong” films anymore. As a long-time HK entertainment fan who grew up on “HK flavor” productions, it’s disappointing to see such lack of support for the HK film industry, and by industry people to boot. Sad!

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      • phixster replied:

        @llwy12 On a business level yes, HK cannot survive and make profit without Mainland investment. Like if I were an investor who was paying for a movie to be produced then yes I would want to invest in collaboration movie because it can make money. The money is in the Mainland that is something that you cannot deny. HK as a market itself cannot sustain a large scale, grand production. It is also probably less profitable now to sell movies to South East Asia as it was once before.

        People who actually want to invest in pure HK films are those who are in it for artistic purposes i.e. indie film makers who appreciate the art of movies – who are let’s face it not business men with money. So hopefully with 10 years we will be seeing more indie films making it into the mainstream and encouraging new and emerging talents.

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  6. phixster says:

    Oh and one more thing. I doubt that Ten Years would have received the attention it did and box office success if it wasn’t picked out and criticised by the Mainland newspaper Global Times which eventually led to it’s boycott and banning.

    Like if it was not made into an issue at all it probably wouldn’t have received any nomination and would have still only been showing in that one independent film cinema. So in a sense Mainland probably ended up doing free promotion of the film especially after it decided to not air the HKFA awards which gave them film much more attention in the media even internationally (I doubt an international distributor would have picked up this film if not for the fact Mainland banned it). So with this its probably going to do well in Taiwan and internationally now.

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    • llwy12 replied:

      @phixster Yup!  That’s actually what many people have been saying all along – Mainland China is actually the one making a bigger deal of things than they really should be.  If they had just left things alone and didn’t try to interfere like they did, the movie wouldn’t have gotten the attention it did.  And not just with Ten Years, but with everything else as well (i.e. the missing booksellers case, where Mainland govt essentially made themselves laughingstocks with those obviously fake public confessions).  Even the producers / directors of the movie said the same thing, which is why every time they are asked whether they are afraid Mainland government is going to take action against them, their reply is why should they be afraid, since they are not doing anything wrong – they are merely exercising their right to say what they want to say via a movie, which is not a crime.

      And to be honest, the “politicizing” of the HK entertainment industry has been happening since HK’s return to China, it’s just that things have gotten way worse the past 2 to 3 years.  It’s almost as though every day, some issue comes up related to the HK-Mainland conflict that is just so unnecessary.  One of the biggest problems is self-censorship, which has been happening a lot more frequently in the entertainment industry as well as in the artistic industry in general – like that earlier ‘controversy’ from a few weeks ago where a theater troupe was forced to remove the word “national” from their program booklets because of its correlation to Taiwan (the reference was in the background introduction to one of the theater group’s performers who had graduated from a University in Taiwan that had the word “National” in it).  Derek Yee’s ‘story’ about the staff who asked him whether they are allowed to use the words “ten years” in their script for the speeches is another great example that drives the point home.  Peter Lam’s point about politics interfering in entertainment may be valid, but honestly, if he’s been paying any attention at all to HK entertainment the past few years, he would know that it’s been happening for awhile already.

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      • phixster replied:

        @llwy12 See that is why I’m so conflicted with this win. I know the entertainment industry has become more politicised these recent years but it has largely been confined to mainstream media/TV and not something as “prestigious” as HKFA which should have been politically neutral and look only at the merits of the film itself.

        You can make political films or films that go into controversial social issues but in order to win Best Film they should actually be good technically as well e.g. Spotlight which won Oscar Best film. 10 years has the controversial theme only and not anything else going for it, meaning it doesn’t actually deserve the Best Film title.

        ps. I was reading some forums and apparently because the transmission of the HKFA by TVB was cut in the Guangzhou area, it received a lot more attention and a lot of people living there heard about 10 years for the first time and are now curious about watching it. Mainland China’s intervention definately had this backfire all over them and you can never underestimate the power of Chinese hackers and internet citizens who have a lot of ways to get past that firewall.

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      • llwy12 replied:

        @phixster Well apparently Mainland China still has not learned their lesson and are making the issue worse. After the ceremony, Mainland China news outlets reported the results of the HKFA, but they censored the part about Best Film. The media outlets that reported the results either didn’t mention the Best Film category at all (essentially, their ‘winners list’ ended with Best Actor) or if they did, they put The Assassin down as the ‘Best Film’ winner (conveniently removing the Mainland China and Taiwan part of the category title). So dumb! Honestly, does Mainland China really think that people aren’t going to find out who actually won? Or do they think their people are truly mindless brainwashed sheep who will just take what they say as fact and not question it?

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      • jimmyszeto replied:

        @llwy12

        They know people will find out but don’t want to publicise anything that is anti-China or any related material that disrespects China. This has always been the case anyway. Every country uses some form of censorship. Some countries more extreme than others.

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  7. kaykay408 says:

    I thought I saw Sisley hold an award at one point when she was congratulating Michael Ning or maybe I saw wrong. Oh and she looked gorgeous! I don’t like Jessie Li.

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    • freedalas replied:

      @kaykay408 I’ve nothing against Sisley in the looks department. She’s really attractive and those long legs! But is her acting skills that really have a long way to go.

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    • llwy12 replied:

      @kaykay408 That was a fake blowup statue – the HKFA committee passed one out to each guest in attendance as a gift.  It was part of the opening segment right after Sean’s intro speech where all those cartoon characters came out to pass them out (it was kind of cute actually, haha).   Best Cinematography winner Christopher Doyle actually brought his up on stage and kept playing with it (I think he had forgotten that he was still holding it, lol)…it was quite funny actually….

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      • kaykay408 replied:

        @llwy12 oh yeah thank you i saw it now. I finally got to watch the whole show. I like that part too.
        Love Jacky and Nick the most, these too are too cute together lol. My favorite one was McDull! I wish it was longer though. Another favorite part is when Carina Lau messed around with Aaron haha. I just don’t like the group singing in the middle of the show. Overall not a bad show, just me though.

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      • llwy12 replied:

        @kaykay408 Haha! Actually, Nick seemed really happy and chirpy all night — he kept ‘flirting’ with his ‘brother’ Jacky and his buddy Sean like throughout the entire ceremony, which was so cute to see, lol! He also kept interjecting comments with some of the presenters (which was hilarious) and every time the camera panned over to him, he was always laughing or smiling. I think he was super-excited that his movie got so much recognition and also that he got to be around so many good friends that night. And I always get a kick out of when they announce the name of that film editing guy who is also named Cheung Ka Fai (though the middle character of the Chinese name is different) and the presenters always have to clarify that it’s not Nick…this time around, Nick actually played along and stood up pretending that they were calling him…haha! Love his sense of humor!

        Yup, I also loved the McDull and Wu Ba segment too — the two of them were sooo cute!! And got to give kudos to whoever scripted McDull’s speech — the jokes were definitely spot-on! I also wish that segment was longer, though kind of hard I guess with only McDull speaking, since Wu Ba only knows how to say “wu ba”, lol…their interaction was extremely cute though!

        I also loved Carina Lau’s segment — she definitely gave the best presentation speech in my opinion. Loved all the subtle references to her husband Tony and the way she played around with the 5 Best Actor nominees. I chuckled at the part where she messed with Aaron and he played along with those facial expressions, lol.

        Oh and what did you think about Andrew Lam and Ronald Cheng’s segment? Omg, Andrew is still as irreverent as ever, though his ability to ad-lib on the spot like that and still be extremely funny is quite amazing. It’s obvious that Andrew hasn’t lost his comedic touch — his quick-witted play on words (which he is famous for by the way) was hilarious and even Ronald couldn’t keep up (I could tell that Ronald was doing everything he could to not break down in a laughing fit right there on the stage, lol.)

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      • kaykay408 replied:

        @llwy12 hey sorry I’m a little bit late, got caught up with some stuff. Lol I agree Jacky and Nick are 2 big kids. I was thinking “where are the wives at?” But looked like they enjoyed each other’s company without the ladies there haha. I can’t get enough of McDull! I actually had to go look for his movies after the show lol. My heart melt!
        I don’t recognize Andrew Lam at all. Maybe I’ve seen him in some older movies and if you point it out right there I’ll recognize him but not at the award. However, I think he was bold playing jokes like that lol.
        Oh I finally found the little girl that was in Stephen Chow’s movie (I think her name is Wong Mei Kei). All these years I have been wondering, where is that cute little girl with such innocent eyes nowadays. She’s so pretty now. Is she still acting?
        And of course Sean did good as a host. Love him.

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      • llwy12 replied:

        @kaykay408 LOL…not sure if you caught that last part of Jacky and Nick’s segment where the guy who won for best action choreography wasn’t there so Nick tried to accept the award on his behalf and was going to say a few words, but they cut straight to a commercial — you could hear Jacky yelling at him to leave, haha.

        Yea, Andrew Lam hasn’t really been active the past couple years but made his comeback last year in the movie Full Strike — his role was quite well-received and even landed him a Best Supporting Actor nomination. He was indeed bold with his jokes, but that’s actually his style — some people didn’t really like his performance though as they thought it wasn’t appropriate for such a ‘prestigious’ ceremony. Yes, his jokes were irreverent and borderline crude, but that’s expected from him, plus he did the job he was invited to do, which was to be funny and also make fun of people. Besides, there have been even cruder segments in the past by others so not sure what the big deal is…

        Wong Mei Kei was actually in quite a few movies and TV series — when I first saw her, first thing I recognized too were those big pretty eyes. I agree that she looks very pretty now. Yes, she’s been acting in recent years — in fact, she was signed with HKTV a few years back and participated in a few of their series. I think she’s still doing movies too.

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      • kaykay408 replied:

        @llwy12 haha yes I did. That was funny! I still have a crush on Nick I think 😉
        I didn’t really follow the movies nowadays mainly because I don’t have access to them anymore. Plus life gets busy and so hard to keep up with all the changes happens in this industry. The most I can do is some TVB dramas. This year is actually first time for a LONG time I got to watch the whole HKFA show. I remember when I was a kid my mom used to send me to my uncle’s place and my cousins played all kind of HK movies, TVB series, music concerts…so I know some of the older ones but not the recent ones. The only actors that I probably can say I watched all of his movies (the old ones) and each at least 5 times is Stephen Chow lol. Don’t remember if you said it before but you mind if I ask, do you live in HK or oversea?

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      • llwy12 replied:

        @kaykay408 I live in the U.S., though most of my relatives outside of immediate family are still in HK. 

        I actually don’t follow HK movies as much anymore either, mostly because there really hasn’t been much worth following the past 10 years or so in the movie industry, plus I have a busy life so makes me a lot more selective on the entertainment-related stuff I choose to follow nowadays.  This is also the first HKFA award show I’ve watched in its entirety in years – I only tuned in because of Jacky’s nomination in the Best Actor category and also curiosity over whether Ten Years would actually win Best Film or not, since I had been following most of the news related to the movie up to that point. Oh, Sean’s hosting too – that was another reason for tuning in, since this was his first time hosting…

        Yea, I’m actually more interested in the ‘older’ artists too, since those are the artists I grew up with and was during a time when I followed the HK entertainment industry way more ‘religiously’ than I do now.  In fact, that’s partly why I even bother watching HK award shows still (or at least parts of the shows – mostly the segments with the artists I’m interested in).  Nowadays, with award shows like HKFA and the TVB anniversary awards, I mostly tune in to watch the presenters and also the musical performances, skits, special tribute segments, etc. –who ends up winning what award doesn’t matter as much to me anymore.

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      • kaykay408 replied:

        @llwy12 oh cool. I live in the US too. Regardless of not living in HK, your knowledge is impressive. I’m learning Chinese all over again so I can read news lol.

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  8. vodka says:

    the never ending story of hatred between China vs HK, I think these movies actually show us some true facts, and portray some what some reality of the future. I hope I can watch it online very soon “Ten years”

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  9. aiya says:

    “Ten Year”‘s victory at the HKFA appears to be based solely on the film’s dark apocalyptic message (on HK’s polticial future) instead of cinematic merits. For that I can see why it has drawn the ire of many filmmakers.

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  10. I guess out of all the nominees for best movie this year ‘Ten Years’ isn’t the worst choice. The subject is interesting and the acting good. I’m glad I saw it but I wouldn’t categorize it as a good movie, let alone ‘best movie of the year’ even knowing it wasn’t a good year for Hong Kong movies in general. Out of the nominated movies this year I would’ve liked ‘Little big master’ to win. It’s a nice little gem.

    I don’t dislike Aaron Kwok in ‘Port of call’ but one would think his performance in ‘Murderer’ alone should prevent him from ever being nominated for any acting awards in existence, let alone win… but then again, he isn’t some inexperienced rookie tv actress people love to hate so.

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    • llwy12 replied:

      @peanutbutterjelly Well-said!

      While I understand people’s arguments about Ten Years not deserving the Best Film award due to its lack of technical merit (even HKFA chairman Derek Yee had said prior to the ceremony that from a ‘professional’ standpoint, Ten Years definitely doesn’t measure up), I also feel that it’s unfair to say the movie was entirely ‘undeserving’ when there is no clearly outlined criteria or clear definition of what constitutes ‘deserving’ in the Best Film category in the first place. Is low budget independent film less deserving than big budget commercial film? Is technical merit in a film more important than the societal impact a film may have on audiences? Should we care more about a film’s lack of artistic value and ‘professionalism’ (in terms of filming methods, aesthetics, etc.) rather than its ability to resonate with audiences through the strong message it sends? There is no ‘right or wrong’ answer in my opinion because it’s not clearly defined in the first place. If the HKFA committee members (all of whom are industry professionals, though not necessarily directors or producers) who voted in that category were given a list of ‘criteria’ to base their decision on (i.e. the movie needs to meet certain technical or artistic requirements, acting needs to be a certain level, etc.) and yet, they still chose Ten Years over the other nominated films, then yes, everyone should be pissed and outraged…but that’s not what happened here, which is why I feel that some of the animosity toward Ten Years’ win is kind of unwarranted. And I’m sorry, but Raymond Wong Bak Ming and also Lam Siu Ming’s complaints about the win (and the strong language they used to ‘bash’ Ten Years) are nothing more than a case of ‘sour grapes’ in my book, since both of their nominated films lost to Ten Years (Raymond Wong was executive producer for Ip Man 3 and Lam Siu Ming is major investor in Little Big Master). The producers/directors of the other 2 nominated films were much more respectable with their responses (Tsui Hark didn’t want to comment since he hadn’t seen Ten Years yet so he felt it wasn’t his place to criticize the HKFA’s decision while Port of Call’s director Philip Yung actually said that he welcomes the decision and admires the HKFA committee’s bravery in not backing down in the face of pressure – he also said that the movie industry is a creative industry and there shouldn’t be restrictions placed on it, whether political, social, or whatnot…)

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      • shirogane replied:

        @llwy12 Indeed. For me, one of the criteria for Best Film, is the ability to resonate with viewers & making viewers unconsciously ponder or reflect on the message of the film.
        This is one of the factor that Ten Years’ critics failed to consider and also the reason that lands Ten Years Best Film Award.

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  11. kidd says:

    Why did the organizing committee not ask Leila Tong to come for the child actors segment? She was a well known child actor who has participated in many TV series and movies. I think she was more well known than Wong Mei Kei as a child actor. She played young Leslie Cheung in ‘The Bride with White Hair’.

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    • minmin00 replied:

      @kidd i think she was originally going to be in that. But she fell sick and couldn’t attend

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