Griselda Yeung Goes for “Fertility” Treatment

By on March 11, 2019 in NEWS

Griselda Yeung Goes for “Fertility” Treatment

The actress, who has a daughter, is keen to expand her family.

Tavia Yeung‘s (楊怡) older sister, Griselda Yeung (楊卓娜), has been married to businessman Yeung Chi Kiu (楊志翹) since 2009. The 41 year-old actress  was recently spotted going to a therapist to improve her fertility in Mongkok.

Stepmom to Husband’s Two Daughters

Known as the “king of advertising light boxes”, Griselda’s husband has two daughters aged 22 and 19 from his first marriage. The girls’ biological mother has already passed away and Griselda shares a close relationship with her two stepdaughters, spending time to connect with them whenever she is free from work.

Griselda gave birth to their first daughter Shu Ran, who is now nine years old. Griselda’s in-laws are reportedly anxious for a grandson to carry on the Yeung family name.

Recently, Griselda was spotted doing a series of womb treatments, tummy massage, acupuncture and other traditional therapies at a beauty clinic in Mongkok, which took five hours. In traditional Chinese medicine, it was believed that by dispelling the cold inside a woman’s body and warming the uterus, it will aid conception and gestation.

The next day, she took her eldest daughter Shu Ting, who works as a secretary a the same clinic for a specialized facial therapy. As it was Shu Ting’s first time trying out the treatment, Griselda stayed by her side and accompanied her throughout, ready to show her concern.

Source: East Week

This article is written by JoyceK for JayneStars.com.

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  • 31 comments to Griselda Yeung Goes for “Fertility” Treatment

    1. m0m0 says:

      many chinese people, esp the older generation want a son. but why wait until the 40s esp when the daughther is already 9 to try conceiving again? if they really want a boy, then go for an IVF or surrogate. it’s not like it is too expensive esp if they have $$.

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      • jimmyszeto replied:

        @m0m0
        Probably because they kept trying naturally but without success…

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      • m0m0 replied:

        @m0m0
        well, late thirties for a year isn’t exactly a young age to keep trying.

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        • littlefish replied:

          @m0m0 so say she gave birth to her daughter, first 2 years, they possibly too exhausted to try. Then the next 6 years, try naturally without success, then another year to try out fertility. Also we don’t know how long they have been trying different techniques of increase fertility. I have a friend who has to go through IVF, and she reckons no one would understand unless they have to go through it by themselves. Because as much you just harvest the eggs, then the lab does the work, but it could still fail. She could be giving out 27 eggs, but the success could be just 1, sometimes none. I also have another friend who tried IVF, took her two years to actually get it. It’s a lot of emotions, up and down, and before the ivf, you need to pump your body full of hormones. And during that time, you tend to feel pretty bad, so if your ivf fail, then you have to go through it again, it possibly need sometimes in between to get yourself mentally ready.

          Not sure about HK, but in Australia, they can’t reveal the sex of the baby, to avoid parents only choosing male embryo. They gave you an analysis of which embryo is most healthy, and whether there is genetic defect.

          Login or Register before you can reply to littlefish
        • m0m0 replied:

          @littlefish
          I know that I’ve is is tumoutous process and full of ups and downs. Funny thing is one couple I know have been considering it. They have no children but the dudes parent want him to have a boy. The dude said his office mate conceived a boy after one or two daughters. According to the dude, his co-worker said it was so simple and bang you get a boy. Even his wife was like, they are going to try it because they want both genders. My husband and I find it very amusing because this couple obviously have no idea of the emotional and physical toll it can take on the woman. I think even if a couple is doing it just for gender selection, that couple have to be pretty determined to stick to the end because there are crazy number of shots. Very painful too.

          I read that surrogacy has become much more expensive in the us because the Chinese are flocking to California to try for a boy. It’s not that much money if you are rich and they tell you the gender here.

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        • littlefish replied:

          @m0m0 I think surrogate present many problems, in some countries, it’s even illegal :/ but yea, easy to just use IVF, but maybe she didn’t want to be called infertile? Because in a lot of infertile case, they were able to have baby due to IVF?

          Anyway, my point before was maybe she did do IVF, but it can still fail and drag the timeline 🙂 like I mentioned before, I had a friend who tried IVF for 2 yrs before she could manage to have a boy, and now she’s waiting for a second one 🙂

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    2. jimmyszeto says:

      A bit old fashioned thinking if there are 3 daughters to raise but still looking to have a son. If my first 2 children were daughters, I would have still stopped…

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      • coralie replied:

        @jimmyszeto do you want to stop due to financial obligations? or you just don’t think you have the energy to deal with so many children?

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        • jimmyszeto replied:

          @coralie
          Good question! Finance not a problem because I was almost broke and barely working when the first child arrived. Plus in England there is enough Govt help than any lower class citizens can have many children anyway. Energy is not a problem too because it is only real stressful in the few years. The main reason able to spread enough time equally for the children to feel loved and not left out. Coming from family of 4 children, I feel 3 will be too much….

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        • coralie replied:

          @jimmyszeto wow, that’s a lot of stress on a first-time father. i can’t say i’d be that brave to have kids when i’m strained financially, but you make a good point. wealth does not determine whether someone can raise kids.

          but that’s great you’re thinking on their behalf and not having more kids so you can spend more time with them.

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        • jimmyszeto replied:

          @coralie
          There is never a good time to have a child. For me the only thing that matter is having it ‘early’. Being young parents does mentally generate a positive effect on the children. They trust and respect your opinions a lot more. Also, I really think about the energy left to look after them when they are in their teenage years. I will never have kids at ages Aaron, Andy and Kevin.Even if I was guaranteed to live till 100 years old..

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        • coralie replied:

          @jimmyszeto There is never a good time, but there is definitely a more ‘prepared’ time, like when parents are more financially stable. The problem there is that nowadays most people aren’t financially stable until they’re in their 30s or later, which is the problem and the reason you see so many more older couples visiting fertility centers. But to push it to the ages of the heavenly kings/kevin is ridiculous.

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        • jimmyszeto replied:

          @coralie
          If I don’t have the financial stability at 20, there’s no guarantee I will have stability at 30 either. I don’t think it is worth risking wasting 10 years …

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        • coralie replied:

          @jimmyszeto my husband said he wanted kids at age 25, for the same reasons you stated, so that he won’t be too old before they’re grown. now we’re in our 30s and he says while he would’ve still wanted to have children in his mid-20s, he wouldn’t have gotten as far in his career now if he didn’t have that space and time to grow in his 20s. so it’s hard to say. if we had kids in our 20s, he probably wouldn’t be where he is today.

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        • jimmyszeto replied:

          @coralie
          True. It worked out for you but could be tough if the mother realises it might take a length of time to become pregnant…

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        • coralie replied:

          @jimmyszeto women in their 30s are still pretty fertile, until they get to age 35, then it might get more difficult. but even then, as long as they’re fertility aware and there are no existing biological problems, i.e., low sperm count, blocked ducts/ovaries/uterus, i think the chances of pregnancy are still pretty high.

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        • jimmyszeto replied:

          @coralie
          Wow. Actor Brian Wong Chak Fung, Wife pregnant at 52…
          https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=XYInk1UxgJQ&t=120s

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        • coralie replied:

          @jimmyszeto i haven’t heard of brian for so long now. it’s nice to know he’s doing well.

          but yeah, as long as the woman’s not completely done with menopause and everything is still working…it’s possible. i just feel bad for the baby; when the baby’s 30, his/her parents will be in their 80s and probably need constant care around the clock. i know they want kids really bad, but it’s still pretty selfish. i also hope the baby’s health is okay…egg quality declines with age and there’s higher likelihood of congenital disorders.

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        • jimmyszeto replied:

          @coralie
          He says he hopes they live till 120. I think they need to too…

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        • coralie replied:

          @jimmyszeto Ignorant folks don’t think about the consequences of their actions when they want something. They don’t plan for the future or know what’s at stake. Even assuming they can live to 120, how great would their quality of life be?

          Login or Register before you can reply to coralie
        • jimmyszeto replied:

          @coralie
          They were already talking in the video about buying policies and insurance for the baby already. Not good signs when parents are so worried about the baby’s future when the baby is so young that it is not born yet. When the kid hits 18, the parents will be in early 70s…

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        • jimmyszeto replied:

          @coralie
          It’s a miracle and they are a likeable, hard working, HK working class couple but it will be a lot of work for them once the baby arrives….

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      • m0m0 replied:

        @jimmyszeto
        it’s not really your choice really b/c some chinese parents tend to think that they own you. it’s either you don’t talk to your parents for the rest of your life or do what they tell you b/c you having a son is their only goal in life.

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        • jimmyszeto replied:

          @m0m0
          I would choose option 1 especially if my wife was 41. Adult health and the years ahead of developing the child is very important. Won’t just gamble on a son for the sake of keeping the bloodline when we won’t even be here….

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        • m0m0 replied:

          @jimmyszeto
          Well, again, the well-being of the wife, family, what the son wants, all things don’t matter. The parents would tell the son to divorce or try to conceived with another woman. It is just the way some think…. I know because I know people who went through this and my in-laws r the same

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    3. coralie says:

      I think my issue with this article is the idea of needing a boy to succeed the family name. That’s such an outdated notion. If they said they wanted to gender balance, at least that’s a little more understandable.

      Login or Register before you can reply to coralie
      • jimmyszeto replied:

        @coralie
        Did the elderly or the parents think that when the mother becomes 60 odd, the boy will still be 20? I doubt they are striving for gender balance if she’s still trying at age 40+. The father is likely even older than the mother. Also its not certain that it will be a boy. Will they try again if the next one is also a girl? Would the grandparents even bother attending the 1 month party if the next one is a girl?

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        • coralie replied:

          @jimmyszeto okay, but in comparison, i think gender balancing is a much more acceptable reason for wanting a son rather than to carry on the surname, age-aside.

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    4. gkoh says:

      Stress of marrying a rich business man, must produce son to carry on family name

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    5. ricky721 says:

      She couldn’t have give birth in May 2019 and now the daughter is 9. Sorry, but, Jayne, I have noticed a lot of these errors with Dates, Spelling of Name etc…

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    6. potatochip says:

      I agree with those that say it is outdated to want a son to carry on the family name. Life does not go as planned. What if the son grows up and does not want kids? What if the son has a medical condition that causes mental deficits? What if he is infertile? That is a lot of pressure on one child.

      It also signals to the daughters that they are not worth as much as the son. Son would be raised coddled and entitled.

      I just saw an interesting news article where a 21 year old Chinese American male died in an unexpected skiing accident. He was the only child, very high achieving, and understandably, the parents are devastated. They requested for the courts to allow them to harvest his sperm to bank for later procreation. I don’t know how I would grieve if I were in their situation, but this seems so extreme.

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