“The Untamed” to Stream on Netflix on October 25

By on October 22, 2019 in NEWS, TV Dramas

“The Untamed” to Stream on Netflix on October 25

The buzz for Chinese xianxia drama The Untamed <陈情令> is still hot although it had finished airing two months ago. Positive reception has shown that its success and popularity are not just confined to China, but is also growing overseas in countries such as South Korea, Thailand and Japan. The Untamed will stream on Netflix on October 25, and fans are concerned how it will fare in the global market, particularly in North America and Europe.

Starring Sean Xiao (肖战and Wang Yibo (王一博), The Untamed is a 50 episode series following two friends who encounter mysterious murders during their travels together. First aired in China from June through August, viewers loved the bromance between the two leads.

Loved in Asia

The Untamed performed well in South Korea, Thailand and Japan. It is reflected in the increase of fanbase and drama scenes topping online discussions. The Untamed crew promoted in Thailand with a fan meeting event recently, and the whole process from the arrival at the airport to the event location was described to be overwhelmingly packed with lively fans who cheered vigorously.

With The Untamed‘s great popularity in Asia, these three countries, many wonder whether it will also be a hit in North America and Europe when it streams on Netflix. Since there are cultural differences, it is highly possible that The Untamed may fail in the western market just like Empresses in the Palace <甄嬛传>, which only achieved a rating close to 2.5 stars on Netflix.

Despite such concerns, some fans feel that it is already an achievement for The Untamed to reach a broader international market as Netflix is a viewing platform with significant market share in North America and Europe.

Source: Sina

This article is written by Minna for JayneStars.com.

How the Cast for “The Untamed” Was Chosen

7 comments to “The Untamed” to Stream on Netflix on October 25

  1. m0m0 says:

    asian boys in girly costumes don’t sell. just the idea of asian boys alone is hardly a selling gimmick. the west is into sporty macho men as supposed to scrawny pale faced male

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    • myden26 replied:

      @m0m0 I agree. The two male leads a too feminine for the U.S and Euro market. This will only work in Asia. However, the LGBT community is bigger in the U.S and Euro. People also are more accepting towards same sex relationships. Let’s wait and see if they prove us wrong.

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      • msxie0714 replied:

        @myden26

        BTS and other K-pop boy bands are very girly, but their popularity in western countries are proving you wrong.

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    • msxie0714 replied:

      @m0m0

      To me, the hanfu costumes are strikingly elegant and no more girly than japanese or korean warriors in kimonos and hanbok.

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  2. coralie says:

    Some of the scenes in the series were so overtly BL that I couldn’t justify watching it as if they’re just bromancing each other.

    There’s a huge difference between bromance (Duke of Mt. Deer, Journey to the West, The Legendary Siblings, etc.) and BL. HUGE! Bromance is such a misnomer for this drama.

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  3. totteridge says:

    Most non-Chinese fans from US and Europe have already watched it, read the novel even before Netflix’s broadcast. The drama was directed by Hong Kong directors, well executed with a good written plot and the actors fit the characters very well. There’s a reason for the drama to be popular.

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    • megamiaow replied:

      @totteridge

      I didnt know about it till now. I hope its available in the uk.

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