Actor Gregory Wong Arrested for Involvement in Hong Kong Protests

By on October 1, 2019 in NEWS

Actor Gregory Wong Arrested for Involvement in Hong Kong Protests

Actor Gregory Wong (王宗堯) was arrested by police for his involvement in Hong Kong protests, specifically storming the Legislative Council building on July 1. He is being investigated for conspiring in destruction of property and entering or staying within the meeting hall area illegally. After being detained by police for 36 hours, Gregory was finally released today.

Gregory’s assistant spoke to the press, “Thanks everyone for your concern and questions. Gregory Wong was detained by the police for 36 hours. Gregory applied for and was granted a personal protection order from the court.” His assistant confirmed that Gregory was released by authorities on October 1.

As charges have been pressed against the 40-year-old actor, his assistant said he can’t disclose details of the case at this time.

It was not widely reported, but several protesters were arrested for the storming into the council building on July 1. Civil rights activist Figo Chan (陳皓桓) revealed that politician Ventus Lau (劉頴匡), who was leading the protest last month in Kwun Tong, was also arrested by police yesterday for the same charges as Gregory. A former president of the student representative council at Hong Kong University Suen Hiu Nam (孫曉嵐) was also arrested for conspiring in destroying and damaging property and entering or staying within the meeting hall area on August 29.

Sources: Ettoday; HK01

This article is written by Minna for JayneStars.com.

17 comments to Actor Gregory Wong Arrested for Involvement in Hong Kong Protests

  1. m0m0 says:

    ah-ya..fighting against forces of evil. brave man.

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  2. anon says:

    Time to jail him in accordance of the law.

    In the US, if you storm and vandalize a government building, it’s terrorism and would be shot without a second thought. How lucky these protesters are protesting in HK.

    4 months into the protest – still no military presence in Hong Kong. This will not be possible anywhere in the West.

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    • conan2209 replied:

      @anon i am surprised with your comments, I thought the west embrace freedom of speech and human rights, isn’t this exactly what HKers are fighting for now?
      Ironically, HKers are turning to the west for support and help.

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      • anon replied:

        @conan2209

        The Mainland has not intervened in HK and send in the military. That is the best possible form of freedom of speech and expression given to HK and to these “protesters”, better than the UK and the US if similar circumstances arise.

        If this happened in the states, US freedom of speech and human rights would declare martial law within a week of a riot, declare it as an act of terrorism (attacked government buildings and police dormitory) and a state of emergency would be declared and send in the national guards (military) and have these rioters arrested, multiple gunshots would be fired at these rioters resulting with at least a few deaths.

        This is the US-style of freedom of speech and human rights that these rioters are fighting for are laughable in my eyes.

        There are many similar western freedom of speech and human rights examples of this in the US and across Western Europe.

        So the fact that these HK rioters are fighting for this type of rights is laughable in my eyes because the mainland has been the most tolerant and restraining than any western country given the same circumstances.

        Furthermore, who’s fighting for the human rights of the people of HK who just want to go about their daily lives and not having to face this level of violence, brutality and threat from these rioters for the past 4 months?

        Most HK people don’t agree with these violent protests, yet a few number of these individuals are affecting the lives of the mass.

        Are these rioters concerned about the freedom and human rights of other HK people?

        No, they only care about themselves.

        They are being used as a pawn as part of the US government’s anti-china stance, but too stupid to realize it.

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      • coralie replied:

        @anon U.S. citizens won’t attack government facilities, because the issue doesn’t lie with where they work. But Americans will stage public protests, attack individual policy makers separately, send threatening letters (one sent a statement saying if that particular individual doesn’t pass Obamacare, s/he will find a way to assassinate them) and we can even impeach the highest level officer. This is all true and has happened. H.K. people can’t do that, so they vent where they can under the cloak of anonymity.

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      • anon replied:

        @coralie

        “But Americans will stage public protests, attack individual policy makers separately, send threatening letters (one sent a statement saying if that particular individual doesn’t pass Obamacare, s/he will find a way to assassinate them)”

        Hong Kong people stage public protests all of the time. We are seeing that now for the past 4 months. For the most part, most of them have been unharmed yet the HK government and the PRC government is still letting this continue. This is impossible in the west. HK people have written threatening letters to government officials in the past.

        HK people can’t impeach the chief executive, but were they able to impeach the former british colonial governor of HK, Chris Patten?

        NO!

        If their white worshippers couldn’t give them that right, there should be no expectations that HK and the Chinese government should give them the same right.

        If the British cared so much about HK’s human rights and democracy, why was that clause not included in the 1997 China-British reunification agreement?

        Because the British didn’t care, and they never gave their colony the same rights. It’s ironic that this should be expected from China.

        Therefore, it’s an irony that they are fighting for rights that even their “great” puppet masters never gave them.

        Britian only began to care about HK’s universal suffrage AFTER HK was handed back to China, but never gave a crap during their control of Hong Kong. Pure western hypocrisy.

        “This is all true and has happened. H.K. people can’t do that, so they vent where they can under the cloak of anonymity.”

        In the US, you will be arrested immediately if you joined a protest with a veiled mask and/or wearing protective combat gear. This is US-style human rights and democracy for you.

        Pointing a laser weapon at a cop is akin to pointing a knife or a gun in the US. You will be arrested immediately.

        While in HK, you can walk around in full protective gear, and pointing military-grade laser pointers at cops without being arrested.

        The West has always been full of hypocrisy. They don’t practice what they preach. They have a standard for themselves, and a separate standard for everybody else.

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      • luye replied:

        @anon why do you think fighting for rights is “laughable”? And I disagree with “mainland has been the most tolerant” Have you forgotten about Tiananmen Square? Mainland hasnt responded with military because of international attention to HK’s protests. I saw videos of violent protesters who ganged up on individuals because of different beliefs, while hitting & harassing them, and that’s so difficult to watch. I hope there will be peace soon

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      • anon replied:

        @luye

        “why do you think fighting for rights is “laughable”?”

        Laughable because they are fighting for rights that are literally eroding in the United States. In many cases, you have more rights in HK than in the US. Most of these protesters don’t even have a clue what they are fighting for.

        “Have you forgotten about Tiananmen Square?”

        Have you forgotten about the Iraq war? You know the weapons of mass destruction that Saddam Hussein supposedly had but none was ever found? At least, China keeps it on its own turf, had learned from their mistakes and had moved on. The US still continues to export terrorism all over the world. The US military has, directly and indirectly, caused tens of millions of civilians and military casualities worldwide since WW2, in addition to millions of war refugee displacements (Syrians, Afghans, Iraqis, etc.), but hey you will never hear that from CNN, NBC, FOX, and CBS. They all support the military-industrial complex for the rich and powerful to invade and conquer other weaker nations for oil and other rich resources. Iran is about to be invaded as I write this.

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      • luye replied:

        @anon Right now, HKers dont vote for their leader. The Chief Executive is chosen by a small committee/approved by China. HK has a legislature with democratically elected representatives (Legislative Council) which is where laws are passed. The Legislative Council has 70 seats. Within the 70 seats, they are either pro-democracy or pro-china. Although Pro-democracy has the popular vote, they occupy less than half of the seats in the Legislative Council because the system is set up so that when HKers vote, they’re only voting for 40/70 seats. 30 are chosen by business representatives – voted by corporations that have good relationships with China; mainly dominated by pro-china political parties. This means only 40 seats are directly electable by the majority of HKers. This is why i dont think it’s unreasonable for HKers to fight for a right to democracy

        It doesnt matter if China “kept it on its own turf” because the government literally murdered students for protesting. At least in the US, the First Amendment allows for freedom to protest.

        Btw, living in US myself, i am in no way defending US actions overseas nor am I saying US is perfect. I know that after 9/11 attack in NYC, wars in Iraq & Afghanistan has led to over 500,000 deaths

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      • anon replied:

        @luye “Right now, HKers dont vote for their leader. The Chief Executive is chosen by a small committee/approved by China. HK has a legislature with democratically elected representatives (Legislative Council) which is where laws are passed. The Legislative Council has 70 seats. Within the 70 seats, they are either pro-democracy or pro-china. Although Pro-democracy has the popular vote, they occupy less than half of the seats in the Legislative Council because the system is set up so that when HKers vote, they’re only voting for 40/70 seats. 30 are chosen by business representatives – voted by corporations that have good relationships with China; mainly dominated by pro-china political parties. This means only 40 seats are directly electable by the majority of HKers. This is why i dont think it’s unreasonable for HKers to fight for a right to democracy”

        Sure you can fight for it…peacefully… but as we all know, it has anything but peaceful for the past 4 months.

        “It doesnt matter if China “kept it on its own turf” because the government literally murdered students for protesting. At least in the US, the First Amendment allows for freedom to protest. ”

        That happened 30 years ago, and it was a one-off incident. While the US government has killed millions, as well as affecting tens and millions of civilians globally, for the past 60 years and that still continues today.

        HK allows protesting. Contrary to popular belief, China also allows protesting. Google it!

        What you’re missing is the fact that it hasn’t been a protest for a while, but a riot for MONTHS, the Hong Kong and Chinese community are against RIOTS – not protests. Learn the difference.

        If China and Hong Kong are against riots and protests, they would’ve sent in the army, shut down the city and arrest all of the rioters in less than a week as it unfolded just like how the US government would’ve done if the exact circumstances happened in the US. But it hasn’t, yet people still have the audacity to say that China and HK does not condone protests and riots when they’ve been so patient and tolerant. It blows my mind.

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      • miyabi replied:

        @anon i just logged in to say i agree with everything you have said, anon. i’m seriously boggled by how patient china has been in these 4 months with hong kong. look at the USA and how they deal with situations where citizens have done nothing wrong. they shoot them. this is the “democracy” the protestors are looking for? western countries spout crap like democracy but are they even practising it? democracy is when they killed native americans? democracy is when they had thousands of chinese built their railroads in the 1800s but had them banned and killed? democracy is when they had segregation between black and white folks? democracy is what happened to brexit? democracy is what happened where trump is elected to office? democracy is where they banned abortion, causing the pain of millions of women who were raped, the deaths of women who needed abortion due to complications in pregnancies? these protestors have been living the good life – they’re so much better off than 99% of countries in asia. they even have disneyland, LMAO. just wtf? who pumped money into disneyland for hongkong? the usa? the british? lmao. was it not china? i can go on and on about this, but the bottom line is these protestors need to return to school and study their damn history. it seems especially embarrassing to be raising the flags of the union jack and star spangled banner asking for white ppl’s help, when these protestors have NO idea what these white people have done to china and chinese (including hongkies) in the past.

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      • luye replied:

        @anon i agree that the violence has gotten out of hand & i was supportive of the peaceful protests in the beginning. 30 yrs ago is not that long ago – their family members are still alive & Chinese government hasnt changed much since then. There are families who are currently impacted by Tiananmen Square massacre. And yes I am aware that US has killed millions. I’m not justifying their actions nor am I saying US is better than China

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  3. mangotango says:

    His dramas and movies will probably be banned from Mainland.

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    • msxie0714 replied:

      @mangotango

      While Liu Yifei and Jackie Chan will likely get death threats if they appeared in HK, who in the mainland ever heard of Gregory Wong to warrant boycotting him?

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  4. cutie777 says:

    Boy sounds like it will never ends. These people definitely has nothing else to do but destroy everything I mean don’t they needs a break? Such as eating, sleeping, using the bathroom? Take care their kids or elderly? Or don’t they needs to go work make money pay bills? I don’t think they will like it if someone damaged their homes. What a mess!!

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  5. coralie says:

    Historically, countries that are still burgeoning from economic hardships do much better when they’re controlled by one entity. That’s why China is doing well under Xi.

    Democracy evolves from Autocracy, when there’s economic success.

    That being said, I can understand HK’s reluctance and rebellion against China. Going back under China’s control means they’re moving back instead of forward in values they care about – values that China doesn’t want them to have.

    You can say that China already gives them a lot of leniency in what HK can do, but it’s not the same as true freedom.

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    • luye replied:

      @coralie exactly! Honestly, people can say HK is part of China, and all that other stuff. But the two cultures & societies are so different. Things have changed. And HK has more freedom. For ex., things that are censored in China arent censored in HK. Death penalty is legal in China. Something like Tiananmen Square massacre wouldnt happen in HK.

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