Moses Chan Says Daughter is a Fast Learner

By on July 23, 2017 in Hot Gossip!, NEWS

Moses Chan Says Daughter is a Fast Learner

My Ages Apart <誇世代> actor Moses Chan (陳豪) attended an event for TVB’s new mobile app on Sunday, where he promoted the app and also shared some tidbits about his family life. Moses married Aimee Chan (陳茵媺) in 2013, and together the couple have three children: 3-year-old son Aiden Joshua, 2-year-old Nathan Lucas, and 1-year-old daughter Camilla.

The 46-year-old actor shared that he has enrolled his eldest son to a international Jewish school near their neighborhood. Asking if it’s true that Aiden has a talent in mathematics, Moses joked, “He can’t be that bad if I’m good at it!” However, he pointed out that his son has more talent in art.

When speaking about the talents of his second son Nathan, Moses said, “He has a very large attention capacity. I think he will do well in research.” (So a scientist?) “Not exactly, but I think he’d be a good learner.” (What about your daughter?) “She’s very smart! She’s a very fast learner. She can speak, walk, eat, and even knows how to flirt!”

As Camilla is the only daughter, has Moses been spoiling her? “I treat them all the same way, but sometimes my two boys would get jealous. My daughter likes to steal things from her second brother sometimes. Maybe it’s because they’re close in age.”

Now the key question—when will Aimee make her comeback? Moses said to wait a little while longer: “She’s working on it. It’s coming. She’s going to be doing a movie soon.” Moses said Aimee has taken the kids back to Canada for the summer holidays. “She wanted to do it for a long time. I was also worried about whether or not bringing the kids back would be a hassle, but everything’s been very good so far!”

Source: On.cc

This article is written by Addy for JayneStars.com.

31 comments to Moses Chan Says Daughter is a Fast Learner

  1. Profile photo of cutie777 cutie777 says:

    Omg!! Moses looked so uncle this day. The daughter looks just like the mom it seem like she doesn’t have a middle name like her 2 brothers? Because it doesn’t mention her middle name. I’m sure it’s not easy take care 3 kids at the same time especially their age are closed I’m sure they don’t get to see their kids much if they send them to Canada hopefully they will work things out and about Aimee return on screen again I don’t know about that since her acting are just so so. Maybe it’s a good idea for her taking care of her kids.

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    • Profile photo of coralie coralie replied:

      @cutie777 I think Camilla looks more like Moses – the same eyes and nose? I can’t tell if face shape is exactly like him too since she’s a little round right now. But doesn’t seem like she inherited her mom’s very pointy face.

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      • Profile photo of happybi happybi replied:

        @coralie Yes. Agree. Camilla does look more like Moses as Aimee has a sharper chin. But they change so much as they grow up so she may start to look like Mommy later.

        flying with 3 kids must be hard!!!!

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  2. Profile photo of megamiaow megamiaow says:

    Its completely unfair that Aimee’s career is the one suffering. Why couldnt Moses have taken a backseat for a year? Why does it have to be the woman?
    Sure he’s more popular than her so can earn more money, but why doesnt he sacrifice a year so she’s not completely forgotten by audiences? He will probably snap back quicker if he returns too.
    These sexist ideals that she needs to stay home and look after babies just because she’s the woman needs to stop (and women need to stand their ground more)

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    • Profile photo of coralie coralie replied:

      @megamiaow It makes sense to me. She needs to breastfeed her kids, so she needs to stay at home. He is a much better actor than her, so she should stay home. He is a much high wage-earner than her, so she should stay home. She, like most parentals, want to watch their kids grow up, so she stays home. Besides, pretty sure she’s forgettable as an actress; can’t say the same for Moses; he’s much more marketable. It all makes logistic sense.

      If you want to look for non-sexism, look no further than Wallace Huo and Ruby Lin’s relationship.

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      • Profile photo of megamiaow megamiaow replied:

        @coralie Wallace Huo and Ruby Lins is no different to this example. Its only less arguable because Ruby is actually the more popular one, so its not as ok to you and everyone else as Moses and Amy.

        Amy was forgettable but also incredibly young, women have a much shorter shelf life than men in the business. Even if Moses right now is more popular who was to say Amy couldnt have made something of herself? If she didnt she would have at least had her go at it.

        Im not saying she wasnt given her choice in it and doesnt enjoy it but compared to the west where female celebs would still strive to their ambitions despite having children, asia has a long way to catch up.

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      • Profile photo of coralie coralie replied:

        @megamiaow Actually I would argue that Ruby & Wallace are both equally popular. Wallace got mega famous since that drama with Zhang Liying. And for a man his age, his charm and appeal will only increase. But he and Ruby have decided that instead of only one party staying at home, one of them will stay at home to be with their daughter should the other one be working. I think that’s pretty fair.

        I’m not trying to argue with you, just presenting you with reasons why it’s not about a sexism thing (though it does exist.) On the whole though, some parts of Asia has been more progressive than the rest (HK being one of them.)

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    • Profile photo of linvin8 linvin8 replied:

      @megamiaow I would think it’s the action of people saying that women should stay home and look after babies that needs to stop. Why is it anyone’s business what a woman does? If she prefers to stay at home to care for her children, so be it. Raising children isn’t a stroll in the park.

      If both parents had to work to be financially stable, then that would have been completely unfair, to the children. Yet, Moses is working twice as hard so Aimee can afford to stay home, so their children can have a parent around.

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      • Profile photo of happybi happybi replied:

        @megamiaow I agree with @linvin8 and @coralie on this. It could be Aimee choice to be a stay at home Mom right now. And being a SAHM is not easy. It’s actually tougher than having a full time job, as you don’t get a lunch break. When it come down to it, Its their choice to put their career on hold. I don’t think the guy force them to be at home. Living in HK is not cheap so if Moses is the one who is bringing in the money, it’s obvious he should be the one who goes back to work first. On the down side, he won’t get to see his children as much so it’s a hard situation for both side IMO. Whatever it is, I believe it’s their choice.

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    • Profile photo of stargirl stargirl replied:

      @megamiaow
      I know how it looks unfair and sexist and old fashioned to outsiders, but no one here actually knows what Aimee is thinking and her reasons behind this decision. Since she did grew up in Canada, and she has a more Western mindset, I do believe she would not force herself to be a fulltime mom and wife if she didn’t want to. Right now, it’s likely a temporary situation and she does mention going back to work, so she might return after she’s done breastfeeding and all the kids are enrolled in preschool. I totally agree with how Asian celebs in general differ so much compared to the other Western celebs. Hardly any mothers keep playing lead roles, and it’s a real pity. Wish there can be more progress, the ones I can name are Lee Bo Young, Eugene, Kay Tse.

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    • @megamiaow I agree. Regardless of choice, the decision seems to be based on the old fashioned mind set stemming from traditional gender roles.

      Sure, it’s practical when it comes to breastfeeding but I honestly don’t see Moses willing to stay at home for a year to bond with the kids in order to encourage Aimee to work on her career, not like she doesn’t make decent money or that they can’t afford it. If that happens in the future I’ll eat my words.

      I’m not saying there is anything wrong with being a stay-at-home mom or that they both should work and neglect their children. But maybe it would be better if the the Nicholas Tses, Julian Cheungs, Hawick Laus and Moses Chans of the world take on the roles of primary caregiver once in a while?

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      • Profile photo of coralie coralie replied:

        @peanutbutterjelly I don’t know, I feel like this is taking a stab at men for not wanting to do child-rearing. I’m not going to say that’s not the case a good chunk of the time, but men staying home to be house husbands often get a lot of flak and pressure from outsiders too. Even when they want to be indoor caretakers, many times they are shamed out of the idea. You get these derogatory terms slammed on them like, “Soft Rice King,” and plenty of judgmental stares, much like Kay Tse & Louis Cheung’s relationship. The higher the profile of the woman, the more likely this is the case. This has to do with gender stereotypes, yes, but men shouldn’t catch all the negativity about it either.

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      • @coralie That’s exactly what @megamiaow and I were saying: the danger and unfairness of gender stereotype and expectations. It’s not only harmful to women but also harmful to men. Like you said if men choose to be the primary caretaker of their children or if the woman makes more money than them they’d be labelled ‘soft rice king’ even though no such stigma is bestowed upon stay-at-home moms. That’s harmful. Likewise, if a straight couple decides to have children and they’re in a position that one of them has to give a up a career then it’s usually the woman who is expected to do so. Even if having children is a mutual decision. We do not live in a society that expects men to quit their job to do child rearing while this pressure does exists for working woman who can ‘afford’ to stay at home. That is also harmful.

        We’re not taking jabs at men, we’re criticising the culture and society that is perpetuating such thinking and behaviour. Moses and Aimee are just examples, I don’t doubt they’re happy with their respective roles in the relationship but it’s worth looking deeper into the culture that has influenced this dynamic and recognizing the dangers of being the products of our time and environment.

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      • Profile photo of coralie coralie replied:

        @peanutbutterjelly

        Right here:
        “I honestly don’t see Moses willing to stay at home for a year to bond with the kids in order to encourage Aimee to work on her career.”

        You’re projecting what a man might or might not do, specifically Moses, as if childrearing is a bigger chore than acting (though it might be to some.) Hence, why I defended men.

        Maybe Moses does want to stay home and be with the kids. He’s always said he’s a fan of Aimee and he wants to see her back at work too. But not right now because of the kids.

        The comment sounded very negative as if men don’t want to take up the mantle. But sometimes they can’t, is what you and I both agree on. And yes, that has to do with gender stereotypes, but in the case of Aimee & Moses, I don’t even think this accusation applies. Y’all dragged a tiny example that doesn’t even seem to even fit with the mold of what we’re discussing. It makes practical sense for Moses to work and Aimee to stay at home with the kids (and most women actually prefer that.)

        I cited a real example of equality with Ruby & Wallace. Equality does happen, maybe not enough to keep everyone happy, but what’s considered equal to one relationship is not considered the same in the other.

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      • @coralie My statement comes from the knowledge that Moses once stated he’s a pretty ‘conservative’ man (I think it was a Jaynestars article too). Maybe still unfair for me to say he most likely wouldn’t but it’s not baseless assumption either.

        I’m not judging him, or any other ‘conservative’ men out there for that matter, either. It’s the culture that we are brought up in and the expectations of society.

        That’s why it’s important to criticise the environment and change the mentality of the status quo which we are all a part of. My goal is not to single anyone out to blame (Moses and Aimee’s situation is just an example of a larger issue) but to stimulate people to think critically as to ‘why’ things happen the way they do.

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      • Profile photo of megamiaow megamiaow replied:

        @peanutbutterjelly I’m surprised so few people here fails to see it too. So many arguing that maybe its ok “she chose”, just like most the female population of asian women ” chose” to stay at home and look after babies and have men come home to moan about their cooking. I am not for one minute fooled that the culture hasnt led to this and condoned this stereotype. Yes it has been their choice but it’s a sad sight to see this culture still flourishing under a supposedly modern city.

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      • Profile photo of happybi happybi replied:

        @megamiaow let me ask you.. are you a Mom? if you are a Mom.. then you should know we carry the baby in out tummy for 9 months.. we have a bond with them that men does not… it’s normal for Mom to choose to stay home with their kids after they are born.. it’s normal.. does everything really need to be label just because she’s the main caregiver and Moses is the one working? She manage the kids and the house.. so technical, she’s the boss of everything! Don’t think it have anything to do with culture but the fact that as a woman who carried the baby.. we more willing to be the one at home… if I was filthy rich I would be a stay at home right this instant. Again, nothing to do with culture. I just want to watch my kids grow up before they don’t need me anymore. simple as that.

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      • @happybi No two moms are the same. Not all women are the same. There are women who don’t want children. There are women who regret having children. There are women who think motherhood is the greatest blessing in life.

        And you know what? None of these opinions are wrong.

        Your own experiences are valid but you should never speak for anyone else. You don’t speak for all mothers or women. Simple as that.

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      • Profile photo of happybi happybi replied:

        @peanutbutterjelly True, not all woman are the same but as a Mom I am speaking from my own experience. You can read what I wrote and agree or not agree. Or you can even skip it. Doesn’t matter to me. Personally, I don’t see why there is a need to dig a deeper meaning into something from this article. But hey if you guys are into things like that, good for you.

        I’m just going to end it by saying that I love reading Moses and Aimee family life. I honestly became their fan when they got married. Their marriage seem strong and their kids are adorable.

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      • Profile photo of megamiaow megamiaow replied:

        @happybi not sure why your asking me why Im a mother. Do I need to be gay if I advocate for gay rights? Is my opinion any less? Please get off your high horse.

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      • Profile photo of happybi happybi replied:

        @megamiaow I’m not on a high horse.. you wonder why people don’t see what you are seeing so I’m asking if you are a Mom as that will explain some thing to me. I’m also trying to explain it from a Mom point of view. If you get this easily offended by such a question and go on defensive mode then what the point of discussing anything. Not everyone will agree with you. Like I know you don’t see thing as me.. just be fine with that and move on.

        anyway done talking about this subject.

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      • Profile photo of stargirl stargirl replied:

        @megamiaow What you’re saying is totally true, the surrounding culture, the societal expectations and peer pressure all play a role in enabling and condoning this kind of lifestyle where the mom is the main caregiver of the children. I get so exasperated whenever I see news articles or editorials expressing how Asian countries (e.g. HK, China, Korea etc.) are becoming more modern and progressive. Hell no. They still have a million miles to go before actually becoming anything like USA or Canada in terms of establishing equality and respecting minorities. However, in this case, I think there’s a good chance that Aimee may not follow the crowd. Unlike her other contemporaries, she does state she wants to work again and she did film a movie when she already had her two sons.

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      • Profile photo of coralie coralie replied:

        @stargirl You guys are confusing real career women types with the regular non-career types women. I don’t think most women in TVB actually enjoy their jobs, to be honest. I’m not talking about just at TVB, this applies to just about every Eastern Asian showbiz culture. You think they enjoy working 3a-2a every day or longer? You think, even with all the popularity they enjoy, that most want to do this for the rest of their lives?

        A lot of times, child-rearing is much more fulfilling than any career for lots of women. Nurturing a family is an important job and many women love doing that more than working 9-5.

        You guys make it sound like it’s some sort of injustice that you see this type of imbalance everywhere as if this isn’t something women enjoy. SOME women don’t, but they’re definitely in the minority. And I say this now even though I used to be like you. But as you get older, you gain perspective. You realize what is really important and what’s not.

        I’m not against what women do or don’t. That’s our prerogative. But Aimee shouldn’t be judged for wanting to take care of kids as if she’s oppressed by some gender stereotype. Everything in her interviews sounds like she wants to stay home & take care of her kids…maybe that’s why she had so many!

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      • Profile photo of pleikupho pleikupho replied:

        @coralie I wholeheartedly agree with you. Some women prefer to raise their kids while their husbands work. I actually outearn my husband but when we have kids, I would like to stay home. And this is not limited to Asian culture either. My white German friend is taking at least a year off to take care of her newborn and she’s perfectly happy with that choice. Just because some women don’t work doesn’t mean they’re oppressed.

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      • @coralie

        “You guys make it sound like it’s some sort of injustice that you see this type of imbalance everywhere as if this isn’t something women enjoy.”

        No, I think you misunderstood us. That’s not what we’re saying at all.

        I think @stargirl summed it up perfectly:

        “the surrounding culture, the societal expectations and peer pressure all play a role in enabling and condoning this kind of lifestyle where the mom is the main caregiver of the children.”

        We’re not criticising any woman’s decision to be a homemaker. But we’re appalled by the culture that essentially tries to pressure ALL women into this same decision.

        Mothers who tries balancing between a career and kids are being shamed, often being called selfish or made to feel guilty because of it. If you don’t believe me try to google the very gender-neutral words: ‘is my career a selfish choice’? I guarantee you it’s not overwhelmingly men who ask this question.

        We are all but products of our environment but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t be critical of the same environment that has shaped us. That’s how progress is made.

        Ultimately everyone has to make the choice that they believe is going to make them happy but we have to ask ourselves: when one choice is obviously the ‘easier’ and more widely accepted one, are we really the ones that are choosing?

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      • Profile photo of coralie coralie replied:

        @peanutbutterjelly yes, but i honestly don’t think moses & aimee’s situation is applicable to what we’re discussing.

        i can see how your example might be applicable in places like japan where the majority places great importance on early childhood development and forces moms to stop working and take care of kids until they reach adulthood. but most of Asia isn’t so narrow-minded.

        the only example that comes to mind about guilting women into feeling awful about balancing work and childcare is Yang Mi & Hawick Lau. In their case, i do think their situation is unfortunate as they’re starting up their company, so can’t generate the time to raise their daughter. a lot of ppl mention that yang mi is rather negligent…which, she is. But so’s Hawick. now THAT’s a legitimate example of sexism at work. not Moses & Aimee.

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  3. Profile photo of anon anon says:

    With the way Aimee acts, it’s not a bad idea that she’s a stay-at-home mother.

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    • @anon I’d rather say that for Moses and he’s more experienced than her. Aimee was pretty good as a lead actress in that movie with Chapman To.

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      • Profile photo of anon anon replied:

        @peanutbutterjelly

        I agree! Moses does not leave much to desire. His acting is pretty wooden. I haven’t seen that movie with Aimee and Chapman.

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  4. Profile photo of funnlim funnlim says:

    Gender based or not, it’s her choice. Why not Vincent Wong stay at home and let his wife work and earn the money and he be house husband? Man more examples. Maybe Aimee likes it this way and maybe Moses is reluctant to leave his children but someone has got to work and the other take care of the kids rather than dump them with grandparents or hire nannies. when they are older Aimee can come back out and act at leisure and she has that luxury because husband’s well to do. To other women or men who aren’t, both had to work and children left with grandparents.

    Moreover, on pay. Moses demands more pay hence it is more practical he works. Same with say the Myolies of the world where if she earns more, she works. That sort.

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  5. Profile photo of rucofan1100 rucofan1100 says:

    props to those that were able to see the real issues at play here: aimee was a terrible actress, thank god she got knocked up and off my tv screen.

    jennifer lawrence not getting equal pay in “american hustle” is sexism, candy yuen being solicited for sex is sexism, beauty pageantry is sexism; aimee chan choosing not to work a brutal tvb schedule, spend more time with the kids (heck maybe even spend more time getting back in shape after giving birth to 3 kids in 4 years), realizing that her award winning actor husband is way more marketable (hate moses all you want, the guy moves the needle) is NOT SEXISM! waste your breath on more appropriate articles

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